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October is Mental Health Awareness can you get lasix without a prescription Month and World Mental Health Day takes place on 10 October 2020. This year, the hypertension medications lasix has added a new dimension to concerns regarding mental health in our communities. Across the globe stories continue to emerge of people’s experiences of anxiety, fear and depression due to the uncertainty and stress brought on can you get lasix without a prescription by the lasix.1–3 Job losses, financial and housing insecurity, the challenges of working from home, home schooling, restricted access to health and social care services and social isolation coupled with reduced support and contact with family and friends have all impacted people’s well-being.

There is particular concern about the mental health of healthcare workers during this difficult time.While most healthcare workers are resilient to the long-term effects of this period of stress and anxiety, there is the added worry about scarce resources, lack of cure or effective treatment options, isolation from family, coping with patient suffering and deaths and the moral and ethical impact of decisions as to who will receive acute care. These factors have significant potential for negative repercussions on the mental health and well-being of healthcare staff.4 5 There have been reports of high levels of stress, depression and even suicides,6 and long-term effects include a higher risk for post-traumatic stress disorder or moral injury.5Healthcare organisations can you get lasix without a prescription need to plan for the inevitable consequence of this lasix and ensure that resources are in place for their workers. Screening for mental health issues and treatment, including counselling, should be made available.

In addition, nurses and other healthcare staff should be encouraged to reflect on their experiences and consider how to implement self-care strategies that will enhance their can you get lasix without a prescription well-being. This includes staying informed of the current data and information and being aware of the risks to themselves and others while caring for patients with the lasix. By monitoring and enacting strategies to reduce stress and develop support systems, staff can minimise longer-term impacts.4Whether organisational support and self-care monitoring have achieved better mental health outcomes for healthcare workers is, as yet, unknown.

Research across the globe is underway not only related to the lasix can you get lasix without a prescription itself but also to the mental health consequences of the lasix. We do not yet know the extent of the issues or how best to support healthcare providers. In order to better understand the issues and to support nurses at this time, evidence-based nursing will focus our social media to mental can you get lasix without a prescription health issues during the month of October.

We will highlight and share relevant resources and information and encourage discussion of the key challenges facing healthcare workers.During October, we will showcase the experiences of four key groups—patients, nurses, students and informal carers and families. Be sure to log into can you get lasix without a prescription evidence-based nursing each week for the following blogs:October 4. Impact of hypertension medications on patient mental health.October 11.

Impact of hypertension medications on nurses’ mental health and.Twitter Chat on Wednesday October 14 at 20:00 UK time.Oct can you get lasix without a prescription. 18. Impact of hypertension medications on student nursing.Oct.

25. Impact of hypertension medications on informal carers and families.A PhD is a globally recognised postgraduate degree and typically the highest degree programme awarded by a University, with students usually required to expand the boundaries of knowledge by undertaking original research. The purpose of PhD programmes of study is to nurture, support and facilitate doctoral students to undertake independent research to expected academic and research standards, culminating in a substantial thesis and examined by viva voce.

In this paper—the first of two linked Research Made Simple articles—we explore what the foundations of a high-quality PhD are, and how a Doctoral candidate can develop a study which is successful, original and impactful.Foundations of a ‘good’ PhD studySupervision and supportCentral to the development and completion of a good PhD is the supervisory relationship between the student and supervisor. The supervisor guides the student by directing them to resources and training to ensure continuous learning, provides opportunity to engage with experts in the field, and facilitates the development of critical thinking through questioning and providing constructive criticism.1The support needs of students will be different, so a flexible yet quality assured approach to PhD research training is required. A good supervisory team (usually includes at least two postdoctoral academics) provide experienced guidance and mentorship and will offer students academic support, with regular meetings and timely feedback on written submissions, will assist the student to develop a peer network and help them access research communities relative to their field.

Effective supervision has beneficial outcomes for students, including encouraging a positive work ethic and influencing engagement in a stimulating environment, allowing students to pursue their own ideas with educated encouragement. The quality of the supervisory relationship can impact greatly on the PhD experience and ultimately sets the student on the road to producing excellent Doctoral work.1An environment that promotes personal and professional development is further aided by positive peer interactions. If students feel part of a community and have contact with others also working on doctoral studies, there is the scope for peer compassion and understanding during both challenging and rewarding periods.

Students who access personal and professional support and guidance through mentoring models during their studies are more likely to succeed. These models include one-to-one peer mentoring or activities for example journal discussion or methods learning groups. Often, groups of students naturally come together and give each other support and advice about research process expectations and challenges, and offer friendship, and guidance.2 Given the usefulness of different types of mentoring models, all can create a supportive and collaborative environment within a PhD programme of study, to minimise working in isolation and enable students to achieve their greatest potential.Characteristics of a good study.

Originality and theoretical underpinningA PhD should make an original contribution to knowledge. Originality can be achieved through the study design, the nature or outcomes of the knowledge synthesis, or the implications for research and/or practice.3 Disciplinary variation, however, influences the assessment of originality. For example, originality in science, technology, engineering and mathematics subjects is often inferred if the work is published/publishable, in comparison to intellectual originality in the social sciences.4 Although PhD originality assumes different nuances in different contexts, there is a general acceptance across disciplines that there should be evidence of the following within the thesis:An interplay between old and new—any claims of originality are developed from existing knowledge and practices.There are degrees of originality, relating to more than one aspect of the thesis.Any claims for originality are accompanied by clear articulation of significance.A good PhD should be also underpinned by theoretical and/or conceptual frameworks (that include philosophical and methodological models) that give clarity to the approach, structure and vision of the study.5 These theoretical and conceptual frameworks can explain why the study is pertinent and how the research addresses gaps in the literature.6 Table 1 provides a distinction of what construes theoretical and conceptual frameworks.View this table:Table 1 Characteristics of theoretical and conceptual frameworks7Theoretical/conceptual frameworks must align with the research question/aims, and the student must be able to articulate how conceptual/theoretical framework were chosen.

Key points for consideration include:Are the research questions/aim and objectives well defined?. What theory/theories/concepts are being operationalised?. How are the theories/concepts related?.

Are the ontological and epistemological perspectives clearly conveyed and how do they relate to theories and concepts outlined?. What are the potential benefits and limitations of the theories and concepts outlined?. Are the ways the theories/concepts are outlined and being used original?.

A PhD thesis (and demonstrable in viva) must be able to offer cohesion between the choice of research methods that stems from the conceptual/theoretical framework, the related ontological and epistemological decisions, the theoretical perspective and the chosen methodology (table 2). PhD students must be able to articulate the methodological decisions made and be critical of methods employed to answer their research questions.View this table:Table 2 Relationship between research paradigms, perspectives, methodologies and methods.8 9ConclusionIn summary, we offer considerations of what the foundations of a good PhD should be. We have considered some of the key ingredients of quality PhD supervision, support and research processes and explored how these will contribute to the development of a study that leads to student success and which makes a valuable contribution to the evidence base.

In the next paper, we will look in more detail at the assessment of the PhD through the submission of a thesis and an oral viva..

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Summary Chart of MSP Programs 2 medicamento lasix. Income Limits &. Rules and Household Size 3.

The Three medicamento lasix MSP Programs - What are they and how are they Different?. 4. FOUR Special Benefits of MSP Programs.

Back Door to Extra Help with Part D MSPs Automatically Waive Late Enrollment Penalties for Part B - and allow enrollment in Part B year-round outside of the short Annual Enrollment Period No Medicaid Lien on Estate to Recover Payment of Expenses Paid by medicamento lasix MSP Food Stamps/SNAP not reduced by Decreased Medical Expenses when Enroll in MSP - at least temporarily 5. Enrolling in an MSP - Automatic Enrollment &. Applications for People who Have Medicare What is Application Process?.

6 medicamento lasix. Enrolling in an MSP for People age 65+ who Do Not Qualify for Free Medicare Part A - the "Part A Buy-In Program" 7. What Happens After MSP Approved - How Part B Premium is Paid 8 Special Rules for QMBs - How Medicare Cost-Sharing Works 1.

NO ASSET medicamento lasix LIMIT!. Since April 1, 2008, none of the three MSP programs have resource limits in New York -- which means many Medicare beneficiaries who might not qualify for Medicaid because of excess resources can qualify for an MSP. 1.A.

SUMMARY CHART OF MSP BENEFITS medicamento lasix QMB SLIMB QI-1 Eligibility ASSET LIMIT NO LIMIT IN NEW YORK STATE INCOME LIMIT (2020) Single Couple Single Couple Single Couple $1,064 $1,437 $1,276 $1,724 $1,436 $1,940 Federal Poverty Level 100% FPL 100 – 120% FPL 120 – 135% FPL Benefits Pays Monthly Part B premium?. YES, and also Part A premium if did not have enough work quarters and meets citizenship requirement. See “Part A Buy-In” YES YES Pays Part A &.

B deductibles medicamento lasix &. Co-insurance YES - with limitations NO NO Retroactive to Filing of Application?. Yes - Benefits begin the month after the month of the MSP application.

18 medicamento lasix NYCRR §360-7.8(b)(5) Yes – Retroactive to 3rd month before month of application, if eligible in prior months Yes – may be retroactive to 3rd month before month of applica-tion, but only within the current calendar year. (No retro for January application). See GIS 07 MA 027.

Can medicamento lasix Enroll in MSP and Medicaid at Same Time?. YES YES NO!. Must choose between QI-1 and Medicaid.

Cannot have both, not medicamento lasix even Medicaid with a spend-down. 2. INCOME LIMITS and RULES Each of the three MSP programs has different income eligibility requirements and provides different benefits.

The income limits medicamento lasix are tied to the Federal Poverty Level (FPL). 2019 FPL levels were released by NYS DOH in GIS 20 MA/02 - 2020 Federal Poverty Levels -- Attachment II and have been posted by Medicaid.gov and the National Council on Aging and are in the chart below. NOTE.

There is usually a lag medicamento lasix in time of several weeks, or even months, from January 1st of each year until the new FPLs are release, and then before the new MSP income limits are officially implemented. During this lag period, local Medicaid offices should continue to use the previous year's FPLs AND count the person's Social Security benefit amount from the previous year - do NOT factor in the Social Security COLA (cost of living adjustment). Once the updated guidelines are released, districts will use the new FPLs and go ahead and factor in any COLA.

See 2019 Fact Sheet on MSP in NYS by Medicare Rights Center ENGLISH SPANISH Income is determined by medicamento lasix the same methodology as is used for determining in eligibility for SSI The rules for counting income for SSI-related (Aged 65+, Blind, or Disabled) Medicaid recipients, borrowed from the SSI program, apply to the MSP program, except for the new rules about counting household size for married couples. N.Y. Soc.

Serv. L. 367-a(3)(c)(2), NYS DOH 2000-ADM-7, 89-ADM-7 p.7.

Gross income is counted, although there are certain types of income that are disregarded. The most common income disregards, also known as deductions, include. (a) The first $20 of your &.

Your spouse's monthly income, earned or unearned ($20 per couple max). (b) SSI EARNED INCOME DISREGARDS. * The first $65 of monthly wages of you and your spouse, * One-half of the remaining monthly wages (after the $65 is deducted).

* Other work incentives including PASS plans, impairment related work expenses (IRWEs), blind work expenses, etc. For information on these deductions, see The Medicaid Buy-In for Working People with Disabilities (MBI-WPD) and other guides in this article -- though written for the MBI-WPD, the work incentives apply to all Medicaid programs, including MSP, for people age 65+, disabled or blind. (c) monthly cost of any health insurance premiums but NOT the Part B premium, since Medicaid will now pay this premium (may deduct Medigap supplemental policies, vision, dental, or long term care insurance premiums, and the Part D premium but only to the extent the premium exceeds the Extra Help benchmark amount) (d) Food stamps not counted.

You can get a more comprehensive listing of the SSI-related income disregards on the Medicaid income disregards chart. As for all benefit programs based on financial need, it is usually advantageous to be considered a larger household, because the income limit is higher. The above chart shows that Households of TWO have a higher income limit than households of ONE.

The MSP programs use the same rules as Medicaid does for the Disabled, Aged and Blind (DAB) which are borrowed from the SSI program for Medicaid recipients in the “SSI-related category.” Under these rules, a household can be only ONE or TWO. 18 NYCRR 360-4.2. See DAB Household Size Chart.

Married persons can sometimes be ONE or TWO depending on arcane rules, which can force a Medicare beneficiary to be limited to the income limit for ONE person even though his spouse who is under 65 and not disabled has no income, and is supported by the client applying for an MSP. EXAMPLE. Bob's Social Security is $1300/month.

He is age 67 and has Medicare. His wife, Nancy, is age 62 and is not disabled and does not work. Under the old rule, Bob was not eligible for an MSP because his income was above the Income limit for One, even though it was well under the Couple limit.

In 2010, NYS DOH modified its rules so that all married individuals will be considered a household size of TWO. DOH GIS 10 MA 10 Medicare Savings Program Household Size, June 4, 2010. This rule for household size is an exception to the rule applying SSI budgeting rules to the MSP program.

Under these rules, Bob is now eligible for an MSP. When is One Better than Two?. Of course, there may be couples where the non-applying spouse's income is too high, and disqualifies the applying spouse from an MSP.

In such cases, "spousal refusal" may be used SSL 366.3(a). (Link is to NYC HRA form, can be adapted for other counties). 3.

The Three Medicare Savings Programs - what are they and how are they different?. 1. Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB).

The QMB program provides the most comprehensive benefits. Available to those with incomes at or below 100% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), the QMB program covers virtually all Medicare cost-sharing obligations. Part B premiums, Part A premiums, if there are any, and any and all deductibles and co-insurance.

QMB coverage is not retroactive. The program’s benefits will begin the month after the month in which your client is found eligible. ** See special rules about cost-sharing for QMBs below - updated with new CMS directive issued January 2012 ** See NYC HRA QMB Recertification form ** Even if you do not have Part A automatically, because you did not have enough wages, you may be able to enroll in the Part A Buy-In Program, in which people eligible for QMB who do not otherwise have Medicare Part A may enroll, with Medicaid paying the Part A premium (Materials by the Medicare Rights Center).

2. Specifiedl Low-Income Medicare Beneficiary (SLMB). For those with incomes between 100% and 120% FPL, the SLMB program will cover Part B premiums only.

SLMB is retroactive, however, providing coverage for three months prior to the month of application, as long as your client was eligible during those months. 3. Qualified Individual (QI-1).

For those with incomes between 120% and 135% FPL, and not receiving Medicaid, the QI-1 program will cover Medicare Part B premiums only. QI-1 is also retroactive, providing coverage for three months prior to the month of application, as long as your client was eligible during those months. However, QI-1 retroactive coverage can only be provided within the current calendar year.

(GIS 07 MA 027) So if you apply in January, you get no retroactive coverage. Q-I-1 recipients would be eligible for Medicaid with a spend-down, but if they want the Part B premium paid, they must choose between enrolling in QI-1 or Medicaid. They cannot be in both.

In contrast, one may receive Medicaid and either QMB or SLIMB. 4. Four Special Benefits of MSPs (in addition to NO ASSET TEST).

Benefit 1. Back Door to Medicare Part D "Extra Help" or Low Income Subsidy -- All MSP recipients are automatically enrolled in Extra Help, the subsidy that makes Part D affordable. They have no Part D deductible or doughnut hole, the premium is subsidized, and they pay very low copayments.

Once they are enrolled in Extra Help by virtue of enrollment in an MSP, they retain Extra Help for the entire calendar year, even if they lose MSP eligibility during that year. The "Full" Extra Help subsidy has the same income limit as QI-1 - 135% FPL. However, many people may be eligible for QI-1 but not Extra Help because QI-1 and the other MSPs have no asset limit.

People applying to the Social Security Administration for Extra Help might be rejected for this reason. Recent (2009-10) changes to federal law called "MIPPA" requires the Social Security Administration (SSA) to share eligibility data with NYSDOH on all persons who apply for Extra Help/ the Low Income Subsidy. Data sent to NYSDOH from SSA will enable NYSDOH to open MSP cases on many clients.

The effective date of the MSP application must be the same date as the Extra Help application. Signatures will not be required from clients. In cases where the SSA data is incomplete, NYSDOH will forward what is collected to the local district for completion of an MSP application.

The State implementing procedures are in DOH 2010 ADM-03. Also see CMS "Dear State Medicaid Director" letter dated Feb. 18, 2010 Benefit 2.

MSPs Automatically Waive Late Enrollment Penalties for Part B Generally one must enroll in Part B within the strict enrollment periods after turning age 65 or after 24 months of Social Security Disability. An exception is if you or your spouse are still working and insured under an employer sponsored group health plan, or if you have End Stage Renal Disease, and other factors, see this from Medicare Rights Center. If you fail to enroll within those short periods, you might have to pay higher Part B premiums for life as a Late Enrollment Penalty (LEP).

Also, you may only enroll in Part B during the Annual Enrollment Period from January 1 - March 31st each year, with Part B not effective until the following July. Enrollment in an MSP automatically eliminates such penalties... For life..

Even if one later ceases to be eligible for the MSP. AND enrolling in an MSP will automatically result in becoming enrolled in Part B if you didn't already have it and only had Part A. See Medicare Rights Center flyer.

Benefit 3. No Medicaid Lien on Estate to Recover MSP Benefits Paid Generally speaking, states may place liens on the Estates of deceased Medicaid recipients to recover the cost of Medicaid services that were provided after the recipient reached the age of 55. Since 2002, states have not been allowed to recover the cost of Medicare premiums paid under MSPs.

In 2010, Congress expanded protection for MSP benefits. Beginning on January 1, 2010, states may not place liens on the Estates of Medicaid recipients who died after January 1, 2010 to recover costs for co-insurance paid under the QMB MSP program for services rendered after January 1, 2010. The federal government made this change in order to eliminate barriers to enrollment in MSPs.

See NYS DOH GIS 10-MA-008 - Medicare Savings Program Changes in Estate Recovery The GIS clarifies that a client who receives both QMB and full Medicaid is exempt from estate recovery for these Medicare cost-sharing expenses. Benefit 4. SNAP (Food Stamp) benefits not reduced despite increased income from MSP - at least temporarily Many people receive both SNAP (Food Stamp) benefits and MSP.

Income for purposes of SNAP/Food Stamps is reduced by a deduction for medical expenses, which includes payment of the Part B premium. Since approval for an MSP means that the client no longer pays for the Part B premium, his/her SNAP/Food Stamps income goes up, so their SNAP/Food Stamps go down. Here are some protections.

Do these individuals have to report to their SNAP worker that their out of pocket medical costs have decreased?. And will the household see a reduction in their SNAP benefits, since the decrease in medical expenses will increase their countable income?. The good news is that MSP households do NOT have to report the decrease in their medical expenses to the SNAP/Food Stamp office until their next SNAP/Food Stamp recertification.

Even if they do report the change, or the local district finds out because the same worker is handling both the MSP and SNAP case, there should be no reduction in the household’s benefit until the next recertification. New York’s SNAP policy per administrative directive 02 ADM-07 is to “freeze” the deduction for medical expenses between certification periods. Increases in medical expenses can be budgeted at the household’s request, but NYS never decreases a household’s medical expense deduction until the next recertification.

Most elderly and disabled households have 24-month SNAP certification periods. Eventually, though, the decrease in medical expenses will need to be reported when the household recertifies for SNAP, and the household should expect to see a decrease in their monthly SNAP benefit. It is really important to stress that the loss in SNAP benefits is NOT dollar for dollar.

A $100 decrease in out of pocket medical expenses would translate roughly into a $30 drop in SNAP benefits. See more info on SNAP/Food Stamp benefits by the Empire Justice Center, and on the State OTDA website. Some clients will be automatically enrolled in an MSP by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) shortly after attaining eligibility for Medicare.

Others need to apply. The 2010 "MIPPA" law introduced some improvements to increase MSP enrollment. See 3rd bullet below.

Also, some people who had Medicaid through the Affordable Care Act before they became eligible for Medicare have special procedures to have their Part B premium paid before they enroll in an MSP. See below. WHO IS AUTOMATICALLY ENROLLED IN AN MSP.

Clients receiving even $1.00 of Supplemental Security Income should be automatically enrolled into a Medicare Savings Program (most often QMB) under New York State’s Medicare Savings Program Buy-in Agreement with the federal government once they become eligible for Medicare. They should receive Medicare Parts A and B. Clients who are already eligible for Medicare when they apply for Medicaid should be automatically assessed for MSP eligibility when they apply for Medicaid.

(NYS DOH 2000-ADM-7 and GIS 05 MA 033). Clients who apply to the Social Security Administration for Extra Help, but are rejected, should be contacted &. Enrolled into an MSP by the Medicaid program directly under new MIPPA procedures that require data sharing.

Strategy TIP. Since the Extra Help filing date will be assigned to the MSP application, it may help the client to apply online for Extra Help with the SSA, even knowing that this application will be rejected because of excess assets or other reason. SSA processes these requests quickly, and it will be routed to the State for MSP processing.

Since MSP applications take a while, at least the filing date will be retroactive. Note. The above strategy does not work as well for QMB, because the effective date of QMB is the month after the month of application.

As a result, the retroactive effective date of Extra Help will be the month after the failed Extra Help application for those with QMB rather than SLMB/QI-1. Applying for MSP Directly with Local Medicaid Program. Those who do not have Medicaid already must apply for an MSP through their local social services district.

(See more in Section D. Below re those who already have Medicaid through the Affordable Care Act before they became eligible for Medicare. If you are applying for MSP only (not also Medicaid), you can use the simplified MSP application form (theDOH-4328(Rev.

8/2017-- English) (2017 Spanish version not yet available). Either application form can be mailed in -- there is no interview requirement anymore for MSP or Medicaid. See 10 ADM-04.

Applicants will need to submit proof of income, a copy of their Medicare card (front &. Back), and proof of residency/address. See the application form for other instructions.

One who is only eligible for QI-1 because of higher income may ONLY apply for an MSP, not for Medicaid too. One may not receive Medicaid and QI-1 at the same time. If someone only eligible for QI-1 wants Medicaid, s/he may enroll in and deposit excess income into a pooled Supplemental Needs Trust, to bring her countable income down to the Medicaid level, which also qualifies him or her for SLIMB or QMB instead of QI-1.

Advocates in NYC can sign up for a half-day "Deputization Training" conducted by the Medicare Rights Center, at which you'll be trained and authorized to complete an MSP application and to submit it via the Medicare Rights Center, which submits it to HRA without the client having to apply in person. Enrolling in an MSP if you already have Medicaid, but just become eligible for Medicare Those who, prior to becoming enrolled in Medicare, had Medicaid through Affordable Care Act are eligible to have their Part B premiums paid by Medicaid (or the cost reimbursed) during the time it takes for them to transition to a Medicare Savings Program. In 2018, DOH clarified that reimbursement of the Part B premium will be made regardless of whether the individual is still in a Medicaid managed care (MMC) plan.

GIS 18 MA/001 Medicaid Managed Care Transition for Enrollees Gaining Medicare ( PDF) provides, "Due to efforts to transition individuals who gain Medicare eligibility and who require LTSS, individuals may not be disenrolled from MMC upon receipt of Medicare. To facilitate the transition and not disadvantage the recipient, the Medicaid program is approving reimbursement of Part B premiums for enrollees in MMC." The procedure for getting the Part B premium paid is different for those whose Medicaid was administered by the NYS of Health Exchange (Marketplace), as opposed to their local social services district. The procedure is also different for those who obtain Medicare because they turn 65, as opposed to obtaining Medicare based on disability.

Either way, Medicaid recipients who transition onto Medicare should be automatically evaluated for MSP eligibility at their next Medicaid recertification. NYS DOH 2000-ADM-7 Individuals can also affirmatively ask to be enrolled in MSP in between recertification periods. IF CLIENT HAD MEDICAID ON THE MARKETPLACE (NYS of Health Exchange) before obtaining Medicare.

IF they obtain Medicare because they turn age 65, they will receive a letter from their local district asking them to "renew" Medicaid through their local district. See 2014 LCM-02. Now, their Medicaid income limit will be lower than the MAGI limits ($842/ mo reduced from $1387/month) and they now will have an asset test.

For this reason, some individuals may lose full Medicaid eligibility when they begin receiving Medicare. People over age 65 who obtain Medicare do NOT keep "Marketplace Medicaid" for 12 months (continuous eligibility) See GIS 15 MA/022 - Continuous Coverage for MAGI Individuals. Since MSP has NO ASSET limit.

Some individuals may be enrolled in the MSP even if they lose Medicaid, or if they now have a Medicaid spend-down. If a Medicare/Medicaid recipient reports income that exceeds the Medicaid level, districts must evaluate the person’s eligibility for MSP. 08 OHIP/ADM-4 ​If you became eligible for Medicare based on disability and you are UNDER AGE 65, you are entitled to keep MAGI Medicaid for 12 months from the month it was last authorized, even if you now have income normally above the MAGI limit, and even though you now have Medicare.

This is called Continuous Eligibility. EXAMPLE. Sam, age 60, was last authorized for Medicaid on the Marketplace in June 2016.

He became enrolled in Medicare based on disability in August 2016, and started receiving Social Security in the same month (he won a hearing approving Social Security disability benefits retroactively, after first being denied disability). Even though his Social Security is too high, he can keep Medicaid for 12 months beginning June 2016. Sam has to pay for his Part B premium - it is deducted from his Social Security check.

He may call the Marketplace and request a refund. This will continue until the end of his 12 months of continues MAGI Medicaid eligibility. He will be reimbursed regardless of whether he is in a Medicaid managed care plan.

See GIS 18 MA/001 Medicaid Managed Care Transition for Enrollees Gaining Medicare (PDF) When that ends, he will renew Medicaid and apply for MSP with his local district. Individuals who are eligible for Medicaid with a spenddown can opt whether or not to receive MSP. (Medicaid Reference Guide (MRG) p.

19). Obtaining MSP may increase their spenddown. MIPPA - Outreach by Social Security Administration -- Under MIPPA, the SSA sends a form letter to people who may be eligible for a Medicare Savings Program or Extra Help (Low Income Subsidy - LIS) that they may apply.

The letters are. · Beneficiary has Extra Help (LIS), but not MSP · Beneficiary has no Extra Help (LIS) or MSP 6. Enrolling in MSP for People Age 65+ who do Not have Free Medicare Part A - the "Part A Buy-In Program" Seniors WITHOUT MEDICARE PART A or B -- They may be able to enroll in the Part A Buy-In program, in which people eligible for QMB who are age 65+ who do not otherwise have Medicare Part A may enroll in Part A, with Medicaid paying the Part A premium.

See Step-by-Step Guide by the Medicare Rights Center). This guide explains the various steps in "conditionally enrolling" in Part A at the SSA office, which must be done before applying for QMB at the Medicaid office, which will then pay the Part A premium. See also GIS 04 MA/013.

In June, 2018, the SSA revised the POMS manual procedures for the Part A Buy-In to to address inconsistencies and confusion in SSA field offices and help smooth the path for QMB enrollment. The procedures are in the POMS Section HI 00801.140 "Premium-Free Part A Enrollments for Qualified Medicare BenefiIaries." It includes important clarifications, such as. SSA Field Offices should explain the QMB program and conditional enrollment process if an individual lacks premium-free Part A and appears to meet QMB requirements.

SSA field offices can add notes to the “Remarks” section of the application and provide a screen shot to the individual so the individual can provide proof of conditional Part A enrollment when applying for QMB through the state Medicaid program. Beneficiaries are allowed to complete the conditional application even if they owe Medicare premiums. In Part A Buy-in states like NYS, SSA should process conditional applications on a rolling basis (without regard to enrollment periods), even if the application coincides with the General Enrollment Period.

(The General Enrollment Period is from Jan 1 to March 31st every year, in which anyone eligible may enroll in Medicare Part A or Part B to be effective on July 1st). 7. What happens after the MSP approval - How is Part B premium paid For all three MSP programs, the Medicaid program is now responsible for paying the Part B premiums, even though the MSP enrollee is not necessarily a recipient of Medicaid.

The local Medicaid office (DSS/HRA) transmits the MSP approval to the NYS Department of Health – that information gets shared w/ SSA and CMS SSA stops deducting the Part B premiums out of the beneficiary’s Social Security check. SSA also refunds any amounts owed to the recipient. (Note.

) CMS “deems” the MSP recipient eligible for Part D Extra Help/ Low Income Subsidy (LIS). ​Can the MSP be retroactive like Medicaid, back to 3 months before the application?. ​The answer is different for the 3 MSP programs.

QMB -No Retroactive Eligibility – Benefits begin the month after the month of the MSP application. 18 NYCRR § 360-7.8(b)(5) SLIMB - YES - Retroactive Eligibility up to 3 months before the application, if was eligible This means applicant may be reimbursed for the 3 months of Part B benefits prior to the month of application. QI-1 - YES up to 3 months but only in the same calendar year.

No retroactive eligibility to the previous year. 7. QMBs -Special Rules on Cost-Sharing.

QMB is the only MSP program which pays not only the Part B premium, but also the Medicare co-insurance. However, there are limitations. First, co-insurance will only be paid if the provide accepts Medicaid.

Not all Medicare provides accept Medicaid. Second, under recent changes in New York law, Medicaid will not always pay the Medicare co-insurance, even to a Medicaid provider. But even if the provider does not accept Medicaid, or if Medicaid does not pay the full co-insurance, the provider is banned from "balance billing" the QMB beneficiary for the co-insurance.

Click here for an article that explains all of these rules. This article was authored by the Empire Justice Center.THE PROBLEM. Meet Joe, whose Doctor has Billed him for the Medicare Coinsurance Joe Client is disabled and has SSD, Medicaid and Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB).

His health care is covered by Medicare, and Medicaid and the QMB program pick up his Medicare cost-sharing obligations. Under Medicare Part B, his co-insurance is 20% of the Medicare-approved charge for most outpatient services. He went to the doctor recently and, as with any other Medicare beneficiary, the doctor handed him a bill for his co-pay.

Now Joe has a bill that he can’t pay. Read below to find out -- SHORT ANSWER. QMB or Medicaid will pay the Medicare coinsurance only in limited situations.

First, the provider must be a Medicaid provider. Second, even if the provider accepts Medicaid, under recent legislation in New York enacted in 2015 and 2016, QMB or Medicaid may pay only part of the coinsurance, or none at all. This depends in part on whether the beneficiary has Original Medicare or is in a Medicare Advantage plan, and in part on the type of service.

However, the bottom line is that the provider is barred from "balance billing" a QMB beneficiary for the Medicare coinsurance. Unfortunately, this creates tension between an individual and her doctors, pharmacies dispensing Part B medications, and other providers. Providers may not know they are not allowed to bill a QMB beneficiary for Medicare coinsurance, since they bill other Medicare beneficiaries.

Even those who know may pressure their patients to pay, or simply decline to serve them. These rights and the ramifications of these QMB rules are explained in this article. CMS is doing more education about QMB Rights.

The Medicare Handbook, since 2017, gives information about QMB Protections. Download the 2020 Medicare Handbook here. See pp.

53, 86. 1. To Which Providers will QMB or Medicaid Pay the Medicare Co-Insurance?.

"Providers must enroll as Medicaid providers in order to bill Medicaid for the Medicare coinsurance." CMS Informational Bulletin issued January 6, 2012, titled "Billing for Services Provided to Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMBs). The CMS bulletin states, "If the provider wants Medicaid to pay the coinsurance, then the provider must register as a Medicaid provider under the state rules." If the provider chooses not to enroll as a Medicaid provider, they still may not "balance bill" the QMB recipient for the coinsurance. 2.

How Does a Provider that DOES accept Medicaid Bill for a QMB Beneficiary?. If beneficiary has Original Medicare -- The provider bills Medicaid - even if the QMB Beneficiary does not also have Medicaid. Medicaid is required to pay the provider for all Medicare Part A and B cost-sharing charges, even if the service is normally not covered by Medicaid (ie, chiropractic, podiatry and clinical social work care).

Whatever reimbursement Medicaid pays the provider constitutes by law payment in full, and the provider cannot bill the beneficiary for any difference remaining. 42 U.S.C. § 1396a(n)(3)(A), NYS DOH 2000-ADM-7 If the QMB beneficiary is in a Medicare Advantage plan - The provider bills the Medicare Advantage plan, then bills Medicaid for the balance using a “16” code to get paid.

The provider must include the amount it received from Medicare Advantage plan. 3. For a Provider who accepts Medicaid, How Much of the Medicare Coinsurance will be Paid for a QMB or Medicaid Beneficiary in NYS?.

The answer to this question has changed by laws enacted in 2015 and 2016. In the proposed 2019 State Budget, Gov. Cuomo has proposed to reduce how much Medicaid pays for the Medicare costs even further.

The amount Medicaid pays is different depending on whether the individual has Original Medicare or is a Medicare Advantage plan, with better payment for those in Medicare Advantage plans. The answer also differs based on the type of service. Part A Deductibles and Coinsurance - Medicaid pays the full Part A hospital deductible ($1,408 in 2020) and Skilled Nursing Facility coinsurance ($176/day) for days 20 - 100 of a rehab stay.

Full payment is made for QMB beneficiaries and Medicaid recipients who have no spend-down. Payments are reduced if the beneficiary has a Medicaid spend-down. For in-patient hospital deductible, Medicaid will pay only if six times the monthly spend-down has been met.

For example, if Mary has a $200/month spend down which has not been met otherwise, Medicaid will pay only $164 of the hospital deductible (the amount exceeding 6 x $200). See more on spend-down here. Medicare Part B - Deductible - Currently, Medicaid pays the full Medicare approved charges until the beneficiary has met the annual deductible, which is $198 in 2020.

For example, Dr. John charges $500 for a visit, for which the Medicare approved charge is $198. Medicaid pays the entire $198, meeting the deductible.

If the beneficiary has a spend-down, then the Medicaid payment would be subject to the spend-down. In the 2019 proposed state budget, Gov. Cuomo proposed to reduce the amount Medicaid pays toward the deductible to the same amount paid for coinsurance during the year, described below.

This proposal was REJECTED by the state legislature. Co-Insurance - The amount medicaid pays in NYS is different for Original Medicare and Medicare Advantage. If individual has Original Medicare, QMB/Medicaid will pay the 20% Part B coinsurance only to the extent the total combined payment the provider receives from Medicare and Medicaid is the lesser of the Medicaid or Medicare rate for the service.

For example, if the Medicare rate for a service is $100, the coinsurance is $20. If the Medicaid rate for the same service is only $80 or less, Medicaid would pay nothing, as it would consider the doctor fully paid = the provider has received the full Medicaid rate, which is lesser than the Medicare rate. Exceptions - Medicaid/QMB wil pay the full coinsurance for the following services, regardless of the Medicaid rate.

ambulance and psychologists - The Gov's 2019 proposal to eliminate these exceptions was rejected. hospital outpatient clinic, certain facilities operating under certificates issued under the Mental Hygiene Law for people with developmental disabilities, psychiatric disability, and chemical dependence (Mental Hygiene Law Articles 16, 31 or 32). SSL 367-a, subd.

1(d)(iii)-(v) , as amended 2015 If individual is in a Medicare Advantage plan, 85% of the copayment will be paid to the provider (must be a Medicaid provider), regardless of how low the Medicaid rate is. This limit was enacted in the 2016 State Budget, and is better than what the Governor proposed - which was the same rule used in Original Medicare -- NONE of the copayment or coinsurance would be paid if the Medicaid rate was lower than the Medicare rate for the service, which is usually the case. This would have deterred doctors and other providers from being willing to treat them.

SSL 367-a, subd. 1(d)(iv), added 2016. EXCEPTIONS.

The Medicare Advantage plan must pay the full coinsurance for the following services, regardless of the Medicaid rate. ambulance ) psychologist ) The Gov's proposal in the 2019 budget to eliminate these exceptions was rejected by the legislature Example to illustrate the current rules. The Medicare rate for Mary's specialist visit is $185.

The Medicaid rate for the same service is $120. Current rules (since 2016). Medicare Advantage -- Medicare Advantage plan pays $135 and Mary is charged a copayment of $50 (amount varies by plan).

Medicaid pays the specialist 85% of the $50 copayment, which is $42.50. The doctor is prohibited by federal law from "balance billing" QMB beneficiaries for the balance of that copayment. Since provider is getting $177.50 of the $185 approved rate, provider will hopefully not be deterred from serving Mary or other QMBs/Medicaid recipients.

Original Medicare - The 20% coinsurance is $37. Medicaid pays none of the coinsurance because the Medicaid rate ($120) is lower than the amount the provider already received from Medicare ($148). For both Medicare Advantage and Original Medicare, if the bill was for a ambulance or psychologist, Medicaid would pay the full 20% coinsurance regardless of the Medicaid rate.

The proposal to eliminate this exception was rejected by the legislature in 2019 budget. . 4.

May the Provider 'Balance Bill" a QMB Benficiary for the Coinsurance if Provider Does Not Accept Medicaid, or if Neither the Patient or Medicaid/QMB pays any coinsurance?. No. Balance billing is banned by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997.

42 U.S.C. § 1396a(n)(3)(A). In an Informational Bulletin issued January 6, 2012, titled "Billing for Services Provided to Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMBs)," the federal Medicare agency - CMS - clarified that providers MAY NOT BILL QMB recipients for the Medicare coinsurance.

This is true whether or not the provider is registered as a Medicaid provider. If the provider wants Medicaid to pay the coinsurance, then the provider must register as a Medicaid provider under the state rules. This is a change in policy in implementing Section 1902(n)(3)(B) of the Social Security Act (the Act), as modified by section 4714 of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, which prohibits Medicare providers from balance-billing QMBs for Medicare cost-sharing.

The CMS letter states, "All Medicare physicians, providers, and suppliers who offer services and supplies to QMBs are prohibited from billing QMBs for Medicare cost-sharing, including deductible, coinsurance, and copayments. This section of the Act is available at. CMCS Informational Bulletin http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/ssact/title19/1902.htm.

QMBs have no legal obligation to make further payment to a provider or Medicare managed care plan for Part A or Part B cost sharing. Providers who inappropriately bill QMBs for Medicare cost-sharing are subject to sanctions. Please note that the statute referenced above supersedes CMS State Medicaid Manual, Chapter 3, Eligibility, 3490.14 (b), which is no longer in effect, but may be causing confusion about QMB billing." The same information was sent to providers in this Medicare Learning Network bulletin, last revised in June 26, 2018.

CMS reminded Medicare Advantage plans of the rule against Balance Billing in the 2017 Call Letter for plan renewals. See this excerpt of the 2017 call letter by Justice in Aging - Prohibition on Billing Medicare-Medicaid Enrollees for Medicare Cost Sharing 5. How do QMB Beneficiaries Show a Provider that they have QMB and cannot be Billed for the Coinsurance?.

It can be difficult to show a provider that one is a QMB. It is especially difficult for providers who are not Medicaid providers to identify QMB's, since they do not have access to online Medicaid eligibility systems Consumers can now call 1-800-MEDICARE to verify their QMB Status and report a billing issue. If a consumer reports a balance billng problem to this number, the Customer Service Rep can escalate the complaint to the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC), which will send a compliance letter to the provider with a copy to the consumer.

See CMS Medicare Learning Network Bulletin effective Dec. 16, 2016. Medicare Summary Notices (MSNs) that Medicare beneficiaries receive every three months state that QMBs have no financial liability for co-insurance for each Medicare-covered service listed on the MSN.

The Remittance Advice (RA) that Medicare sends to providers shows the same information. By spelling out billing protections on a service-by-service basis, the MSNs provide clarity for both the QMB beneficiary and the provider. Justice in Aging has posted samples of what the new MSNs look like here.

They have also updated Justice in Aging’s Improper Billing Toolkit to incorporate references to the MSNs in its model letters that you can use to advocate for clients who have been improperly billed for Medicare-covered services. CMS is implementing systems changes that will notify providers when they process a Medicare claim that the patient is QMB and has no cost-sharing liability. The Medicare Summary Notice sent to the beneficiary will also state that the beneficiary has QMB and no liability.

These changes were scheduled to go into effect in October 2017, but have been delayed. Read more about them in this Justice in Aging Issue Brief on New Strategies in Fighting Improper Billing for QMBs (Feb. 2017).

QMBs are issued a Medicaid benefit card (by mail), even if they do not also receive Medicaid. The card is the mechanism for health care providers to bill the QMB program for the Medicare deductibles and co-pays. Unfortunately, the Medicaid card dos not indicate QMB eligibility.

Not all people who have Medicaid also have QMB (they may have higher incomes and "spend down" to the Medicaid limits. Advocates have asked for a special QMB card, or a notation on the Medicaid card to show that the individual has QMB. See this Report - a National Survey on QMB Identification Practices published by Justice in Aging, authored by Peter Travitsky, NYLAG EFLRP staff attorney.

The Report, published in March 2017, documents how QMB beneficiaries could be better identified in order to ensure providers do not bill them improperly. 6. If you are Billed -​ Strategies Consumers can now call 1-800-MEDICARE to report a billing issue.

If a consumer reports a balance billng problem to this number, the Customer Service Rep can escalate the complaint to the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC), which will send a compliance letter to the provider with a copy to the consumer. See CMS Medicare Learning Network Bulletin effective Dec. 16, 2016.

Send a letter to the provider, using the Justice In Aging Model model letters to providers to explain QMB rights.​​​ both for Original Medicare (Letters 1-2) and Medicare Advantage (Letters 3-5) - see Overview of model letters. Include a link to the CMS Medicare Learning Network Notice. Prohibition on Balance Billing Dually Eligible Individuals Enrolled in the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) Program (revised June 26.

2018) In January 2017, the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau issued this guide to QMB billing. A consumer who has a problem with debt collection, may also submit a complaint online or call the CFPB at 1-855-411-2372. TTY/TDD users can call 1-855-729-2372.

Medicare Advantage members should complain to their Medicare Advantage plan.

L why not find out more can you get lasix without a prescription. § 367-a(3)(a), (b), and (d). 2020 Medicare 101 Basics for New York State - 1.5 hour webinar by Eric Hausman, sponsored by NYS Office of the Aging TOPICS COVERED IN THIS ARTICLE 1. No can you get lasix without a prescription Asset Limit 1A. Summary Chart of MSP Programs 2.

Income Limits &. Rules can you get lasix without a prescription and Household Size 3. The Three MSP Programs - What are they and how are they Different?. 4. FOUR Special Benefits can you get lasix without a prescription of MSP Programs.

Back Door to Extra Help with Part D MSPs Automatically Waive Late Enrollment Penalties for Part B - and allow enrollment in Part B year-round outside of the short Annual Enrollment Period No Medicaid Lien on Estate to Recover Payment of Expenses Paid by MSP Food Stamps/SNAP not reduced by Decreased Medical Expenses when Enroll in MSP - at least temporarily 5. Enrolling in an MSP - Automatic Enrollment &. Applications for People who Have Medicare What can you get lasix without a prescription is Application Process?. 6. Enrolling in an MSP for People age 65+ who Do Not Qualify for Free Medicare Part A - the "Part A Buy-In Program" 7.

What Happens After MSP Approved - How Part B Premium is Paid 8 Special can you get lasix without a prescription Rules for QMBs - How Medicare Cost-Sharing Works 1. NO ASSET LIMIT!. Since April 1, 2008, none of the three MSP programs have resource limits in New York -- which means many Medicare beneficiaries who might not qualify for Medicaid because of excess resources can qualify for an MSP. 1.A can you get lasix without a prescription. SUMMARY CHART OF MSP BENEFITS QMB SLIMB QI-1 Eligibility ASSET LIMIT NO LIMIT IN NEW YORK STATE INCOME LIMIT (2020) Single Couple Single Couple Single Couple $1,064 $1,437 $1,276 $1,724 $1,436 $1,940 Federal Poverty Level 100% FPL 100 – 120% FPL 120 – 135% FPL Benefits Pays Monthly Part B premium?.

YES, and also Part A premium if did not have enough work quarters and meets citizenship requirement. See “Part A Buy-In” YES can you get lasix without a prescription YES Pays Part A &. B deductibles &. Co-insurance YES - with limitations NO NO Retroactive to Filing of Application?. Yes - Benefits begin the month after the month of the MSP can you get lasix without a prescription application.

18 NYCRR §360-7.8(b)(5) Yes – Retroactive to 3rd month before month of application, if eligible in prior months Yes – may be retroactive to 3rd month before month of applica-tion, but only within the current calendar year. (No retro for January application). See GIS 07 can you get lasix without a prescription MA 027. Can Enroll in MSP and Medicaid at Same Time?. YES YES NO!.

Must choose between QI-1 and Medicaid can you get lasix without a prescription. Cannot have both, not even Medicaid with a spend-down. 2. INCOME LIMITS and RULES Each of the three MSP programs has different income eligibility requirements and provides can you get lasix without a prescription different benefits. The income limits are tied to the Federal Poverty Level (FPL).

2019 FPL levels were released by NYS DOH in GIS 20 MA/02 - 2020 Federal Poverty Levels -- Attachment II and have been posted by Medicaid.gov and the National Council on Aging and are in the chart below. NOTE can you get lasix without a prescription. There is usually a lag in time of several weeks, or even months, from January 1st of each year until the new FPLs are release, and then before the new MSP income limits are officially implemented. During this lag period, local Medicaid offices should continue to use the previous year's FPLs AND count the person's Social Security benefit amount from the previous year - do NOT factor in the Social Security COLA (cost of living adjustment). Once the updated guidelines are released, districts will use the new FPLs and go ahead and can you get lasix without a prescription factor in any COLA.

See 2019 Fact Sheet on MSP in NYS by Medicare Rights Center ENGLISH SPANISH Income is determined by the same methodology as is used for determining in eligibility for SSI The rules for counting income for SSI-related (Aged 65+, Blind, or Disabled) Medicaid recipients, borrowed from the SSI program, apply to the MSP program, except for the new rules about counting household size for married couples. N.Y. Soc. Serv. L.

367-a(3)(c)(2), NYS DOH 2000-ADM-7, 89-ADM-7 p.7. Gross income is counted, although there are certain types of income that are disregarded. The most common income disregards, also known as deductions, include. (a) The first $20 of your &. Your spouse's monthly income, earned or unearned ($20 per couple max).

(b) SSI EARNED INCOME DISREGARDS. * The first $65 of monthly wages of you and your spouse, * One-half of the remaining monthly wages (after the $65 is deducted). * Other work incentives including PASS plans, impairment related work expenses (IRWEs), blind work expenses, etc. For information on these deductions, see The Medicaid Buy-In for Working People with Disabilities (MBI-WPD) and other guides in this article -- though written for the MBI-WPD, the work incentives apply to all Medicaid programs, including MSP, for people age 65+, disabled or blind. (c) monthly cost of any health insurance premiums but NOT the Part B premium, since Medicaid will now pay this premium (may deduct Medigap supplemental policies, vision, dental, or long term care insurance premiums, and the Part D premium but only to the extent the premium exceeds the Extra Help benchmark amount) (d) Food stamps not counted.

You can get a more comprehensive listing of the SSI-related income disregards on the Medicaid income disregards chart. As for all benefit programs based on financial need, it is usually advantageous to be considered a larger household, because the income limit is higher. The above chart shows that Households of TWO have a higher income limit than households of ONE. The MSP programs use the same rules as Medicaid does for the Disabled, Aged and Blind (DAB) which are borrowed from the SSI program for Medicaid recipients in the “SSI-related category.” Under these rules, a household can be only ONE or TWO. 18 NYCRR 360-4.2.

See DAB Household Size Chart. Married persons can sometimes be ONE or TWO depending on arcane rules, which can force a Medicare beneficiary to be limited to the income limit for ONE person even though his spouse who is under 65 and not disabled has no income, and is supported by the client applying for an MSP. EXAMPLE. Bob's Social Security is $1300/month. He is age 67 and has Medicare.

His wife, Nancy, is age 62 and is not disabled and does not work. Under the old rule, Bob was not eligible for an MSP because his income was above the Income limit for One, even though it was well under the Couple limit. In 2010, NYS DOH modified its rules so that all married individuals will be considered a household size of TWO. DOH GIS 10 MA 10 Medicare Savings Program Household Size, June 4, 2010. This rule for household size is an exception to the rule applying SSI budgeting rules to the MSP program.

Under these rules, Bob is now eligible for an MSP. When is One Better than Two?. Of course, there may be couples where the non-applying spouse's income is too high, and disqualifies the applying spouse from an MSP. In such cases, "spousal refusal" may be used SSL 366.3(a). (Link is to NYC HRA form, can be adapted for other counties).

3. The Three Medicare Savings Programs - what are they and how are they different?. 1. Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB). The QMB program provides the most comprehensive benefits.

Available to those with incomes at or below 100% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), the QMB program covers virtually all Medicare cost-sharing obligations. Part B premiums, Part A premiums, if there are any, and any and all deductibles and co-insurance. QMB coverage is not retroactive. The program’s benefits will begin the month after the month in which your client is found eligible. ** See special rules about cost-sharing for QMBs below - updated with new CMS directive issued January 2012 ** See NYC HRA QMB Recertification form ** Even if you do not have Part A automatically, because you did not have enough wages, you may be able to enroll in the Part A Buy-In Program, in which people eligible for QMB who do not otherwise have Medicare Part A may enroll, with Medicaid paying the Part A premium (Materials by the Medicare Rights Center).

2. Specifiedl Low-Income Medicare Beneficiary (SLMB). For those with incomes between 100% and 120% FPL, the SLMB program will cover Part B premiums only. SLMB is retroactive, however, providing coverage for three months prior to the month of application, as long as your client was eligible during those months. 3.

Qualified Individual (QI-1). For those with incomes between 120% and 135% FPL, and not receiving Medicaid, the QI-1 program will cover Medicare Part B premiums only. QI-1 is also retroactive, providing coverage for three months prior to the month of application, as long as your client was eligible during those months. However, QI-1 retroactive coverage can only be provided within the current calendar year. (GIS 07 MA 027) So if you apply in January, you get no retroactive coverage.

Q-I-1 recipients would be eligible for Medicaid with a spend-down, but if they want the Part B premium paid, they must choose between enrolling in QI-1 or Medicaid. They cannot be in both. It is their choice. DOH MRG p. 19.

In contrast, one may receive Medicaid and either QMB or SLIMB. 4. Four Special Benefits of MSPs (in addition to NO ASSET TEST). Benefit 1. Back Door to Medicare Part D "Extra Help" or Low Income Subsidy -- All MSP recipients are automatically enrolled in Extra Help, the subsidy that makes Part D affordable.

They have no Part D deductible or doughnut hole, the premium is subsidized, and they pay very low copayments. Once they are enrolled in Extra Help by virtue of enrollment in an MSP, they retain Extra Help for the entire calendar year, even if they lose MSP eligibility during that year. The "Full" Extra Help subsidy has the same income limit as QI-1 - 135% FPL. However, many people may be eligible for QI-1 but not Extra Help because QI-1 and the other MSPs have no asset limit. People applying to the Social Security Administration for Extra Help might be rejected for this reason.

Recent (2009-10) changes to federal law called "MIPPA" requires the Social Security Administration (SSA) to share eligibility data with NYSDOH on all persons who apply for Extra Help/ the Low Income Subsidy. Data sent to NYSDOH from SSA will enable NYSDOH to open MSP cases on many clients. The effective date of the MSP application must be the same date as the Extra Help application. Signatures will not be required from clients. In cases where the SSA data is incomplete, NYSDOH will forward what is collected to the local district for completion of an MSP application.

The State implementing procedures are in DOH 2010 ADM-03. Also see CMS "Dear State Medicaid Director" letter dated Feb. 18, 2010 Benefit 2. MSPs Automatically Waive Late Enrollment Penalties for Part B Generally one must enroll in Part B within the strict enrollment periods after turning age 65 or after 24 months of Social Security Disability. An exception is if you or your spouse are still working and insured under an employer sponsored group health plan, or if you have End Stage Renal Disease, and other factors, see this from Medicare Rights Center.

If you fail to enroll within those short periods, you might have to pay higher Part B premiums for life as a Late Enrollment Penalty (LEP). Also, you may only enroll in Part B during the Annual Enrollment Period from January 1 - March 31st each year, with Part B not effective until the following July. Enrollment in an MSP automatically eliminates such penalties... For life.. Even if one later ceases to be eligible for the MSP.

AND enrolling in an MSP will automatically result in becoming enrolled in Part B if you didn't already have it and only had Part A. See Medicare Rights Center flyer. Benefit 3. No Medicaid Lien on Estate to Recover MSP Benefits Paid Generally speaking, states may place liens on the Estates of deceased Medicaid recipients to recover the cost of Medicaid services that were provided after the recipient reached the age of 55. Since 2002, states have not been allowed to recover the cost of Medicare premiums paid under MSPs.

In 2010, Congress expanded protection for MSP benefits. Beginning on January 1, 2010, states may not place liens on the Estates of Medicaid recipients who died after January 1, 2010 to recover costs for co-insurance paid under the QMB MSP program for services rendered after January 1, 2010. The federal government made this change in order to eliminate barriers to enrollment in MSPs. See NYS DOH GIS 10-MA-008 - Medicare Savings Program Changes in Estate Recovery The GIS clarifies that a client who receives both QMB and full Medicaid is exempt from estate recovery for these Medicare cost-sharing expenses. Benefit 4.

SNAP (Food Stamp) benefits not reduced despite increased income from MSP - at least temporarily Many people receive both SNAP (Food Stamp) benefits and MSP. Income for purposes of SNAP/Food Stamps is reduced by a deduction for medical expenses, which includes payment of the Part B premium. Since approval for an MSP means that the client no longer pays for the Part B premium, his/her SNAP/Food Stamps income goes up, so their SNAP/Food Stamps go down. Here are some protections. Do these individuals have to report to their SNAP worker that their out of pocket medical costs have decreased?.

And will the household see a reduction in their SNAP benefits, since the decrease in medical expenses will increase their countable income?. The good news is that MSP households do NOT have to report the decrease in their medical expenses to the SNAP/Food Stamp office until their next SNAP/Food Stamp recertification. Even if they do report the change, or the local district finds out because the same worker is handling both the MSP and SNAP case, there should be no reduction in the household’s benefit until the next recertification. New York’s SNAP policy per administrative directive 02 ADM-07 is to “freeze” the deduction for medical expenses between certification periods. Increases in medical expenses can be budgeted at the household’s request, but NYS never decreases a household’s medical expense deduction until the next recertification.

Most elderly and disabled households have 24-month SNAP certification periods. Eventually, though, the decrease in medical expenses will need to be reported when the household recertifies for SNAP, and the household should expect to see a decrease in their monthly SNAP benefit. It is really important to stress that the loss in SNAP benefits is NOT dollar for dollar. A $100 decrease in out of pocket medical expenses would translate roughly into a $30 drop in SNAP benefits. See more info on SNAP/Food Stamp benefits by the Empire Justice Center, and on the State OTDA website.

Some clients will be automatically enrolled in an MSP by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) shortly after attaining eligibility for Medicare. Others need to apply. The 2010 "MIPPA" law introduced some improvements to increase MSP enrollment. See 3rd bullet below. Also, some people who had Medicaid through the Affordable Care Act before they became eligible for Medicare have special procedures to have their Part B premium paid before they enroll in an MSP.

See below. WHO IS AUTOMATICALLY ENROLLED IN AN MSP. Clients receiving even $1.00 of Supplemental Security Income should be automatically enrolled into a Medicare Savings Program (most often QMB) under New York State’s Medicare Savings Program Buy-in Agreement with the federal government once they become eligible for Medicare. They should receive Medicare Parts A and B. Clients who are already eligible for Medicare when they apply for Medicaid should be automatically assessed for MSP eligibility when they apply for Medicaid.

(NYS DOH 2000-ADM-7 and GIS 05 MA 033). Clients who apply to the Social Security Administration for Extra Help, but are rejected, should be contacted &. Enrolled into an MSP by the Medicaid program directly under new MIPPA procedures that require data sharing. Strategy TIP. Since the Extra Help filing date will be assigned to the MSP application, it may help the client to apply online for Extra Help with the SSA, even knowing that this application will be rejected because of excess assets or other reason.

SSA processes these requests quickly, and it will be routed to the State for MSP processing. Since MSP applications take a while, at least the filing date will be retroactive. Note. The above strategy does not work as well for QMB, because the effective date of QMB is the month after the month of application. As a result, the retroactive effective date of Extra Help will be the month after the failed Extra Help application for those with QMB rather than SLMB/QI-1.

Applying for MSP Directly with Local Medicaid Program. Those who do not have Medicaid already must apply for an MSP through their local social services district. (See more in Section D. Below re those who already have Medicaid through the Affordable Care Act before they became eligible for Medicare. If you are applying for MSP only (not also Medicaid), you can use the simplified MSP application form (theDOH-4328(Rev.

8/2017-- English) (2017 Spanish version not yet available). Either application form can be mailed in -- there is no interview requirement anymore for MSP or Medicaid. See 10 ADM-04. Applicants will need to submit proof of income, a copy of their Medicare card (front &. Back), and proof of residency/address.

See the application form for other instructions. One who is only eligible for QI-1 because of higher income may ONLY apply for an MSP, not for Medicaid too. One may not receive Medicaid and QI-1 at the same time. If someone only eligible for QI-1 wants Medicaid, s/he may enroll in and deposit excess income into a pooled Supplemental Needs Trust, to bring her countable income down to the Medicaid level, which also qualifies him or her for SLIMB or QMB instead of QI-1. Advocates in NYC can sign up for a half-day "Deputization Training" conducted by the Medicare Rights Center, at which you'll be trained and authorized to complete an MSP application and to submit it via the Medicare Rights Center, which submits it to HRA without the client having to apply in person.

Enrolling in an MSP if you already have Medicaid, but just become eligible for Medicare Those who, prior to becoming enrolled in Medicare, had Medicaid through Affordable Care Act are eligible to have their Part B premiums paid by Medicaid (or the cost reimbursed) during the time it takes for them to transition to a Medicare Savings Program. In 2018, DOH clarified that reimbursement of the Part B premium will be made regardless of whether the individual is still in a Medicaid managed care (MMC) plan. GIS 18 MA/001 Medicaid Managed Care Transition for Enrollees Gaining Medicare ( PDF) provides, "Due to efforts to transition individuals who gain Medicare eligibility and who require LTSS, individuals may not be disenrolled from MMC upon receipt of Medicare. To facilitate the transition and not disadvantage the recipient, the Medicaid program is approving reimbursement of Part B premiums for enrollees in MMC." The procedure for getting the Part B premium paid is different for those whose Medicaid was administered by the NYS of Health Exchange (Marketplace), as opposed to their local social services district. The procedure is also different for those who obtain Medicare because they turn 65, as opposed to obtaining Medicare based on disability.

Either way, Medicaid recipients who transition onto Medicare should be automatically evaluated for MSP eligibility at their next Medicaid recertification. NYS DOH 2000-ADM-7 Individuals can also affirmatively ask to be enrolled in MSP in between recertification periods. IF CLIENT HAD MEDICAID ON THE MARKETPLACE (NYS of Health Exchange) before obtaining Medicare. IF they obtain Medicare because they turn age 65, they will receive a letter from their local district asking them to "renew" Medicaid through their local district. See 2014 LCM-02.

Now, their Medicaid income limit will be lower than the MAGI limits ($842/ mo reduced from $1387/month) and they now will have an asset test. For this reason, some individuals may lose full Medicaid eligibility when they begin receiving Medicare. People over age 65 who obtain Medicare do NOT keep "Marketplace Medicaid" for 12 months (continuous eligibility) See GIS 15 MA/022 - Continuous Coverage for MAGI Individuals. Since MSP has NO ASSET limit. Some individuals may be enrolled in the MSP even if they lose Medicaid, or if they now have a Medicaid spend-down.

If a Medicare/Medicaid recipient reports income that exceeds the Medicaid level, districts must evaluate the person’s eligibility for MSP. 08 OHIP/ADM-4 ​If you became eligible for Medicare based on disability and you are UNDER AGE 65, you are entitled to keep MAGI Medicaid for 12 months from the month it was last authorized, even if you now have income normally above the MAGI limit, and even though you now have Medicare. This is called Continuous Eligibility. EXAMPLE. Sam, age 60, was last authorized for Medicaid on the Marketplace in June 2016.

He became enrolled in Medicare based on disability in August 2016, and started receiving Social Security in the same month (he won a hearing approving Social Security disability benefits retroactively, after first being denied disability). Even though his Social Security is too high, he can keep Medicaid for 12 months beginning June 2016. Sam has to pay for his Part B premium - it is deducted from his Social Security check. He may call the Marketplace and request a refund. This will continue until the end of his 12 months of continues MAGI Medicaid eligibility.

He will be reimbursed regardless of whether he is in a Medicaid managed care plan. See GIS 18 MA/001 Medicaid Managed Care Transition for Enrollees Gaining Medicare (PDF) When that ends, he will renew Medicaid and apply for MSP with his local district. Individuals who are eligible for Medicaid with a spenddown can opt whether or not to receive MSP. (Medicaid Reference Guide (MRG) p. 19).

Obtaining MSP may increase their spenddown. MIPPA - Outreach by Social Security Administration -- Under MIPPA, the SSA sends a form letter to people who may be eligible for a Medicare Savings Program or Extra Help (Low Income Subsidy - LIS) that they may apply. The letters are. · Beneficiary has Extra Help (LIS), but not MSP · Beneficiary has no Extra Help (LIS) or MSP 6. Enrolling in MSP for People Age 65+ who do Not have Free Medicare Part A - the "Part A Buy-In Program" Seniors WITHOUT MEDICARE PART A or B -- They may be able to enroll in the Part A Buy-In program, in which people eligible for QMB who are age 65+ who do not otherwise have Medicare Part A may enroll in Part A, with Medicaid paying the Part A premium.

See Step-by-Step Guide by the Medicare Rights Center). This guide explains the various steps in "conditionally enrolling" in Part A at the SSA office, which must be done before applying for QMB at the Medicaid office, which will then pay the Part A premium. See also GIS 04 MA/013. In June, 2018, the SSA revised the POMS manual procedures for the Part A Buy-In to to address inconsistencies and confusion in SSA field offices and help smooth the path for QMB enrollment. The procedures are in the POMS Section HI 00801.140 "Premium-Free Part A Enrollments for Qualified Medicare BenefiIaries." It includes important clarifications, such as.

SSA Field Offices should explain the QMB program and conditional enrollment process if an individual lacks premium-free Part A and appears to meet QMB requirements. SSA field offices can add notes to the “Remarks” section of the application and provide a screen shot to the individual so the individual can provide proof of conditional Part A enrollment when applying for QMB through the state Medicaid program. Beneficiaries are allowed to complete the conditional application even if they owe Medicare premiums. In Part A Buy-in states like NYS, SSA should process conditional applications on a rolling basis (without regard to enrollment periods), even if the application coincides with the General Enrollment Period. (The General Enrollment Period is from Jan 1 to March 31st every year, in which anyone eligible may enroll in Medicare Part A or Part B to be effective on July 1st).

7. What happens after the MSP approval - How is Part B premium paid For all three MSP programs, the Medicaid program is now responsible for paying the Part B premiums, even though the MSP enrollee is not necessarily a recipient of Medicaid. The local Medicaid office (DSS/HRA) transmits the MSP approval to the NYS Department of Health – that information gets shared w/ SSA and CMS SSA stops deducting the Part B premiums out of the beneficiary’s Social Security check. SSA also refunds any amounts owed to the recipient. (Note.

This process can take awhile!. !. !. ) CMS “deems” the MSP recipient eligible for Part D Extra Help/ Low Income Subsidy (LIS). ​Can the MSP be retroactive like Medicaid, back to 3 months before the application?.

​The answer is different for the 3 MSP programs. QMB -No Retroactive Eligibility – Benefits begin the month after the month of the MSP application. 18 NYCRR § 360-7.8(b)(5) SLIMB - YES - Retroactive Eligibility up to 3 months before the application, if was eligible This means applicant may be reimbursed for the 3 months of Part B benefits prior to the month of application. QI-1 - YES up to 3 months but only in the same calendar year. No retroactive eligibility to the previous year.

7. QMBs -Special Rules on Cost-Sharing. QMB is the only MSP program which pays not only the Part B premium, but also the Medicare co-insurance. However, there are limitations. First, co-insurance will only be paid if the provide accepts Medicaid.

Not all Medicare provides accept Medicaid. Second, under recent changes in New York law, Medicaid will not always pay the Medicare co-insurance, even to a Medicaid provider. But even if the provider does not accept Medicaid, or if Medicaid does not pay the full co-insurance, the provider is banned from "balance billing" the QMB beneficiary for the co-insurance. Click here for an article that explains all of these rules. This article was authored by the Empire Justice Center.THE PROBLEM.

Meet Joe, whose Doctor has Billed him for the Medicare Coinsurance Joe Client is disabled and has SSD, Medicaid and Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB). His health care is covered by Medicare, and Medicaid and the QMB program pick up his Medicare cost-sharing obligations. Under Medicare Part B, his co-insurance is 20% of the Medicare-approved charge for most outpatient services. He went to the doctor recently and, as with any other Medicare beneficiary, the doctor handed him a bill for his co-pay. Now Joe has a bill that he can’t pay.

Read below to find out -- SHORT ANSWER. QMB or Medicaid will pay the Medicare coinsurance only in limited situations. First, the provider must be a Medicaid provider. Second, even if the provider accepts Medicaid, under recent legislation in New York enacted in 2015 and 2016, QMB or Medicaid may pay only part of the coinsurance, or none at all. This depends in part on whether the beneficiary has Original Medicare or is in a Medicare Advantage plan, and in part on the type of service.

However, the bottom line is that the provider is barred from "balance billing" a QMB beneficiary for the Medicare coinsurance. Unfortunately, this creates tension between an individual and her doctors, pharmacies dispensing Part B medications, and other providers. Providers may not know they are not allowed to bill a QMB beneficiary for Medicare coinsurance, since they bill other Medicare beneficiaries. Even those who know may pressure their patients to pay, or simply decline to serve them. These rights and the ramifications of these QMB rules are explained in this article.

CMS is doing more education about QMB Rights. The Medicare Handbook, since 2017, gives information about QMB Protections. Download the 2020 Medicare Handbook here. See pp. 53, 86.

1. To Which Providers will QMB or Medicaid Pay the Medicare Co-Insurance?. "Providers must enroll as Medicaid providers in order to bill Medicaid for the Medicare coinsurance." CMS Informational Bulletin issued January 6, 2012, titled "Billing for Services Provided to Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMBs). The CMS bulletin states, "If the provider wants Medicaid to pay the coinsurance, then the provider must register as a Medicaid provider under the state rules." If the provider chooses not to enroll as a Medicaid provider, they still may not "balance bill" the QMB recipient for the coinsurance. 2.

How Does a Provider that DOES accept Medicaid Bill for a QMB Beneficiary?. If beneficiary has Original Medicare -- The provider bills Medicaid - even if the QMB Beneficiary does not also have Medicaid. Medicaid is required to pay the provider for all Medicare Part A and B cost-sharing charges, even if the service is normally not covered by Medicaid (ie, chiropractic, podiatry and clinical social work care). Whatever reimbursement Medicaid pays the provider constitutes by law payment in full, and the provider cannot bill the beneficiary for any difference remaining. 42 U.S.C.

§ 1396a(n)(3)(A), NYS DOH 2000-ADM-7 If the QMB beneficiary is in a Medicare Advantage plan - The provider bills the Medicare Advantage plan, then bills Medicaid for the balance using a “16” code to get paid. The provider must include the amount it received from Medicare Advantage plan. 3. For a Provider who accepts Medicaid, How Much of the Medicare Coinsurance will be Paid for a QMB or Medicaid Beneficiary in NYS?. The answer to this question has changed by laws enacted in 2015 and 2016.

In the proposed 2019 State Budget, Gov. Cuomo has proposed to reduce how much Medicaid pays for the Medicare costs even further. The amount Medicaid pays is different depending on whether the individual has Original Medicare or is a Medicare Advantage plan, with better payment for those in Medicare Advantage plans. The answer also differs based on the type of service. Part A Deductibles and Coinsurance - Medicaid pays the full Part A hospital deductible ($1,408 in 2020) and Skilled Nursing Facility coinsurance ($176/day) for days 20 - 100 of a rehab stay.

Full payment is made for QMB beneficiaries and Medicaid recipients who have no spend-down. Payments are reduced if the beneficiary has a Medicaid spend-down. For in-patient hospital deductible, Medicaid will pay only if six times the monthly spend-down has been met. For example, if Mary has a $200/month spend down which has not been met otherwise, Medicaid will pay only $164 of the hospital deductible (the amount exceeding 6 x $200). See more on spend-down here.

Medicare Part B - Deductible - Currently, Medicaid pays the full Medicare approved charges until the beneficiary has met the annual deductible, which is $198 in 2020. For example, Dr. John charges $500 for a visit, for which the Medicare approved charge is $198. Medicaid pays the entire $198, meeting the deductible. If the beneficiary has a spend-down, then the Medicaid payment would be subject to the spend-down.

In the 2019 proposed state budget, Gov. Cuomo proposed to reduce the amount Medicaid pays toward the deductible to the same amount paid for coinsurance during the year, described below. This proposal was REJECTED by the state legislature. Co-Insurance - The amount medicaid pays in NYS is different for Original Medicare and Medicare Advantage. If individual has Original Medicare, QMB/Medicaid will pay the 20% Part B coinsurance only to the extent the total combined payment the provider receives from Medicare and Medicaid is the lesser of the Medicaid or Medicare rate for the service.

For example, if the Medicare rate for a service is $100, the coinsurance is $20. If the Medicaid rate for the same service is only $80 or less, Medicaid would pay nothing, as it would consider the doctor fully paid = the provider has received the full Medicaid rate, which is lesser than the Medicare rate. Exceptions - Medicaid/QMB wil pay the full coinsurance for the following services, regardless of the Medicaid rate. ambulance and psychologists - The Gov's 2019 proposal to eliminate these exceptions was rejected. hospital outpatient clinic, certain facilities operating under certificates issued under the Mental Hygiene Law for people with developmental disabilities, psychiatric disability, and chemical dependence (Mental Hygiene Law Articles 16, 31 or 32).

SSL 367-a, subd. 1(d)(iii)-(v) , as amended 2015 If individual is in a Medicare Advantage plan, 85% of the copayment will be paid to the provider (must be a Medicaid provider), regardless of how low the Medicaid rate is. This limit was enacted in the 2016 State Budget, and is better than what the Governor proposed - which was the same rule used in Original Medicare -- NONE of the copayment or coinsurance would be paid if the Medicaid rate was lower than the Medicare rate for the service, which is usually the case. This would have deterred doctors and other providers from being willing to treat them. SSL 367-a, subd.

1(d)(iv), added 2016. EXCEPTIONS. The Medicare Advantage plan must pay the full coinsurance for the following services, regardless of the Medicaid rate. ambulance ) psychologist ) The Gov's proposal in the 2019 budget to eliminate these exceptions was rejected by the legislature Example to illustrate the current rules. The Medicare rate for Mary's specialist visit is $185.

The Medicaid rate for the same service is $120. Current rules (since 2016). Medicare Advantage -- Medicare Advantage plan pays $135 and Mary is charged a copayment of $50 (amount varies by plan). Medicaid pays the specialist 85% of the $50 copayment, which is $42.50. The doctor is prohibited by federal law from "balance billing" QMB beneficiaries for the balance of that copayment.

Since provider is getting $177.50 of the $185 approved rate, provider will hopefully not be deterred from serving Mary or other QMBs/Medicaid recipients. Original Medicare - The 20% coinsurance is $37. Medicaid pays none of the coinsurance because the Medicaid rate ($120) is lower than the amount the provider already received from Medicare ($148). For both Medicare Advantage and Original Medicare, if the bill was for a ambulance or psychologist, Medicaid would pay the full 20% coinsurance regardless of the Medicaid rate. The proposal to eliminate this exception was rejected by the legislature in 2019 budget.

. 4. May the Provider 'Balance Bill" a QMB Benficiary for the Coinsurance if Provider Does Not Accept Medicaid, or if Neither the Patient or Medicaid/QMB pays any coinsurance?. No. Balance billing is banned by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997.

42 U.S.C. § 1396a(n)(3)(A). In an Informational Bulletin issued January 6, 2012, titled "Billing for Services Provided to Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMBs)," the federal Medicare agency - CMS - clarified that providers MAY NOT BILL QMB recipients for the Medicare coinsurance. This is true whether or not the provider is registered as a Medicaid provider. If the provider wants Medicaid to pay the coinsurance, then the provider must register as a Medicaid provider under the state rules.

This is a change in policy in implementing Section 1902(n)(3)(B) of the Social Security Act (the Act), as modified by section 4714 of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, which prohibits Medicare providers from balance-billing QMBs for Medicare cost-sharing. The CMS letter states, "All Medicare physicians, providers, and suppliers who offer services and supplies to QMBs are prohibited from billing QMBs for Medicare cost-sharing, including deductible, coinsurance, and copayments. This section of the Act is available at. CMCS Informational Bulletin http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/ssact/title19/1902.htm. QMBs have no legal obligation to make further payment to a provider or Medicare managed care plan for Part A or Part B cost sharing.

Providers who inappropriately bill QMBs for Medicare cost-sharing are subject to sanctions. Please note that the statute referenced above supersedes CMS State Medicaid Manual, Chapter 3, Eligibility, 3490.14 (b), which is no longer in effect, but may be causing confusion about QMB billing." The same information was sent to providers in this Medicare Learning Network bulletin, last revised in June 26, 2018. CMS reminded Medicare Advantage plans of the rule against Balance Billing in the 2017 Call Letter for plan renewals. See this excerpt of the 2017 call letter by Justice in Aging - Prohibition on Billing Medicare-Medicaid Enrollees for Medicare Cost Sharing 5. How do QMB Beneficiaries Show a Provider that they have QMB and cannot be Billed for the Coinsurance?.

It can be difficult to show a provider that one is a QMB. It is especially difficult for providers who are not Medicaid providers to identify QMB's, since they do not have access to online Medicaid eligibility systems Consumers can now call 1-800-MEDICARE to verify their QMB Status and report a billing issue. If a consumer reports a balance billng problem to this number, the Customer Service Rep can escalate the complaint to the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC), which will send a compliance letter to the provider with a copy to the consumer. See CMS Medicare Learning Network Bulletin effective Dec. 16, 2016.

Medicare Summary Notices (MSNs) that Medicare beneficiaries receive every three months state that QMBs have no financial liability for co-insurance for each Medicare-covered service listed on the MSN. The Remittance Advice (RA) that Medicare sends to providers shows the same information. By spelling out billing protections on a service-by-service basis, the MSNs provide clarity for both the QMB beneficiary and the provider. Justice in Aging has posted samples of what the new MSNs look like here. They have also updated Justice in Aging’s Improper Billing Toolkit to incorporate references to the MSNs in its model letters that you can use to advocate for clients who have been improperly billed for Medicare-covered services.

CMS is implementing systems changes that will notify providers when they process a Medicare claim that the patient is QMB and has no cost-sharing liability. The Medicare Summary Notice sent to the beneficiary will also state that the beneficiary has QMB and no liability. These changes were scheduled to go into effect in October 2017, but have been delayed. Read more about them in this Justice in Aging Issue Brief on New Strategies in Fighting Improper Billing for QMBs (Feb. 2017).

QMBs are issued a Medicaid benefit card (by mail), even if they do not also receive Medicaid. The card is the mechanism for health care providers to bill the QMB program for the Medicare deductibles and co-pays. Unfortunately, the Medicaid card dos not indicate QMB eligibility. Not all people who have Medicaid also have QMB (they may have higher incomes and "spend down" to the Medicaid limits. Advocates have asked for a special QMB card, or a notation on the Medicaid card to show that the individual has QMB.

See this Report - a National Survey on QMB Identification Practices published by Justice in Aging, authored by Peter Travitsky, NYLAG EFLRP staff attorney. The Report, published in March 2017, documents how QMB beneficiaries could be better identified in order to ensure providers do not bill them improperly. 6. If you are Billed -​ Strategies Consumers can now call 1-800-MEDICARE to report a billing issue. If a consumer reports a balance billng problem to this number, the Customer Service Rep can escalate the complaint to the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC), which will send a compliance letter to the provider with a copy to the consumer.

See CMS Medicare Learning Network Bulletin effective Dec. 16, 2016. Send a letter to the provider, using the Justice In Aging Model model letters to providers to explain QMB rights.​​​ both for Original Medicare (Letters 1-2) and Medicare Advantage (Letters 3-5) - see Overview of model letters. Include a link to the CMS Medicare Learning Network Notice. Prohibition on Balance Billing Dually Eligible Individuals Enrolled in the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) Program (revised June 26.

What should I watch for while using Lasix?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Check your blood pressure regularly. Ask your doctor or health care professional what your blood pressure should be, and when you should contact him or her. If you are a diabetic, check your blood sugar as directed.

You may need to be on a special diet while taking Lasix. Check with your doctor. Also, ask how many glasses of fluid you need to drink a day. You must not get dehydrated.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this drug affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol can make you more drowsy and dizzy. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

Lasix can make you more sensitive to the sun. Keep out of the sun. If you cannot avoid being in the sun, wear protective clothing and use sunscreen. Do not use sun lamps or tanning beds/booths.

Lasix effect on kidneys

Therefore, these families lasix effect on kidneys are often neglected and rarely followed in oncogenetic consultations.GC also develops in the context of other inherited cancer predisposition syndromes.18 In particular, GC has been identified in the tumour spectrum of Lynch syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, juvenile polyposis, and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, among others.19–22 Therefore, genes causing hereditary cancer susceptibility syndromes, even if only slightly associated with GC susceptibility, would be good candidates to test as potential FIGC causal genes.Herein, we used a next-generation sequencing approach to interrogate a panel of genes implicated in upper gastrointestinal tract cancer, or in cancer Continue susceptibility syndromes, across 50 probands with familial aggregation of IGC from Tuscany, a region from Italy with high incidence of GC.23 The access to a highly homogeneous FIGC cohort, the largest ever studied, and its comparison with an HDGC series and a cohort of sporadic intestinal gastric cancer (SIGC) allowed us to define three objectives and to extend the current knowledge on FIGC predisposition. (1) characterise the age of cancer onset and disease spectrum of our FIGC cohort. (2) search for evidence for a Mendelian and monogenic pattern of inheritance. And (3) search for evidence of alternative oligogenic/polygenic lasix effect on kidneys modes of inheritance.Herein, we gathered evidence that FIGC is likely a genetically determined, GC-predisposing disease, different at the clinical, germline and somatic levels from SIGC and HDGC. We further proposed the first testing criteria for FIGC families.MethodsPatient selectionFifty FIGC and 17 HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative probands were admitted at the Division of General Surgery and Surgical Oncology, University of Siena, Italy.

The selection of FIGC families was based on the following criteria. (1) proband presenting with GC of lasix effect on kidneys intestinal histology. (2) familial aggregation of GC. (3) family history of cancer, other than gastric. (4) negative genetic test for germline CDH1 coding lasix effect on kidneys sequence mutations (exclusion of HDGC).

And (5) negative genetic test for germline for the promoter 1B of APC (exclusion of GAPPS). The 17 HDGC probands were negative for CDH1 germline coding mutations and selected as a control group. Forty-seven patients with SIGC were lasix effect on kidneys collected in Portugal.Multigene panel sequencing, variant calling and filteringDNA from normal gastric mucosa (germline) and tumour tissue from 50 FIGC and 17 HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative probands were sequenced using three Illumina MiSeq custom panels. TruSeq Custom Amplicon Assay 1, TruSeq Custom Amplicon Assay 2 and Nextera custom panel (online supplementary table 1). The selection of genes deposited in each panel was based on their implication in upper gastrointestinal tract cancers or in cancer susceptibility syndromes identified through literature review (online supplementary table 2).

FASTQ files were aligned to the RefSeq Human Genome GRCh38 using bwa-mem, and variants were lasix effect on kidneys called using Samtools.24 25 Called variants were defined as germline or somatic by normal-tumour pair comparison and annotated with Ensembl and Catalogue Of Somatic Mutations In Cancer (COSMIC (FATHMM- Functional Analysis through Hidden Markov Models).26 27 High-quality (HQ) germline or somatic variants were defined as presenting ≥20 reads per allele and genotype quality ≥90 and call quality ≥100. Next, all single nucleotide polymorphism database (dbSNP) identifiers available for FIGC germline variants (regardless of quality criteria) were screened in four European populations from 1000 Genomes. (1) 107 normal individuals from Tuscany (Italy, TSI). (2) 91 normal individuals from Great lasix effect on kidneys Britain (GBR). (3) 99 normal individuals from Finland (FIN).

And (4) 107 normal individuals from Spain (IBS).28 Germline variants without dbSNP identifiers available in the 1000 Genomes were screened using Ensembl VEP for truncating consequences. Detected truncating variants presented on average less than lasix effect on kidneys four reads, that is, were of low quality and discarded. FIGC germline, rare HQ exclusive variants were selected if they (1) displayed genotypes in FIGCs distinct from GBR, FIN and IBS populations and below 1% in the TSI population. (2) presented ≥20 reads per allele, genotype quality ≥90 and call quality ≥100. (3) displayed lasix effect on kidneys genotypes distinct from HDGCs and SIGCs.

And (4) presented allele frequency in ExAC and gnomAD populations below 1%.29Supplemental materialSupplemental materialValidation of FIGC germline, rare HQ exclusive variants by Sanger sequencingTwelve out of 32 FIGC germline, rare HQ exclusive variants were validated by PCR-Sanger sequencing. Briefly, 20–50 ng of DNA from normal and matched tumour was amplified using Multiplex PCR Kit (Qiagen) and custom primers flanking each variant. PCR products were purified with ExoSAP-IT Express (Applied Biosystems) and sequenced on an ABI3100 Genetic Analyzer using BigDye Terminator V.3.1 Cycle Sequencing Kit (Applied Biosystems).Intronic germline variants were analysed using the lasix effect on kidneys splice site prediction software NetGene2 V.2.4.30Somatic second-hit analysisLoss of heterozygosity (LOH) and somatic second mutations were determined by calculating the variant allele frequency (VAF) and screening genes with FIGC germline, rare HQ exclusive variants, respectively. In particular, VAF was calculated by dividing the number of reads for the variant allele by the total number of reads both for the normal and for the corresponding tumour samples. LOH was defined when more than 20% increase of VAF over normal was observed.Germline and somatic landscape analysis of 50 FIGC casesFIGC germline and somatic landscapes were analysed on a per-variant and per-gene basis, considering the number of FIGC germline, rare HQ exclusive variants detected per proband (0, 1 or >1).

The similarities/differences for the lasix effect on kidneys germline and somatic variant and gene landscapes per FIGC class were analysed using unsupervised hierarchical clustering using R package ggplot2 for heatmap and dendrogram construction.31 For somatic variant/gene landscape analysis, FIGC classes were also divided according to microsatellite instable status and compared using analysis of variance statistics with R. The number of microsatellite instable (MSI) and microsatellite stable (MSS) tumours per FIGC class was compared using Pearson’s χ2 test.Comparison of germline and somatic landscapes for FIGC, SIGC and HDGCVCF files obtained from whole genome sequencing (Complete Genomics platform) of 47 SIGCs and VCF files of 17 HDGCs were analysed to detect germline and somatic variants, using the same germline/somatic variant definition and sequencing quality criteria previously described for FIGC cases. Of note, due to the differential resolution between whole genome sequencing and targeted sequencing, only variants detected in the 47 SIGCs in the same regions targeted by the custom panels were selected for downstream analysis.Germline and somatic landscapes of FIGC, SIGC and HDGC cases were performed on a per-gene basis. Each gene was classified lasix effect on kidneys as presenting 0 or ≥1 germline/somatic variants. Germline and somatic joint landscape was defined by counting the number of germline and somatic variants for each gene, which was classified as displaying no germline or somatic variants.

‰¥1 germline and 0 somatic variants. 0 germline and lasix effect on kidneys ≥1 somatic variants. Or ≥1 germline and ≥1 somatic variants. Results were plotted in a heatmap and a dendrogram, and principal component analysis was performed using R. The frequency of genes with germline/somatic variants in FIGCs, SIGCs and HDGCs was calculated, and genes with a frequency difference ≥50% were represented in a bar plot and in a heatmap using R.ResultsAge of onset and disease spectrum in FIGCOf lasix effect on kidneys the 50 FIGC probands (table 1), 18 were female and 32 were male.

The mean age at diagnosis was 71.8±8.0 years. From the 50 families depicted in table 1, 5 (10%) had >1 FDR with GC (mean age. 68.8±7.5 years) lasix effect on kidneys. 14 (28%) had concomitantly FDR and SDR or FDR and third-degree relatives with GC (mean age. 68.7±8.4 years).

29 (58%) had a single FDR with GC (mean lasix effect on kidneys age. 73.6±7.2 years). And 2 (4%) had only SDR affected with GC (mean. 74±15.6 years).View this table:Table 1 Clinical characteristics of FIGC probands and their family historyWhen considering the disease spectrum in these FIGC families, 19 different phenotypes have been observed affecting 208 family members (figure 1, table 1) lasix effect on kidneys. The most prevalent phenotype was GC, detected in 138 of 208 (66.3%) family members.

50 probands with IGC and 88 additional patients with unknown GC histology. The second and lasix effect on kidneys third most prevalent phenotypes were colorectal/colon and breast cancer observed in nine patients from seven families. Of note, eight patients from six families were affected with gastric ulcer, a non-cancerous lesion, which is the third most common disease phenotype in this cohort. Besides these phenotypes, positive history of lung cancer was observed in six families. Leukaemia in five families lasix effect on kidneys.

Laryngotracheal and hepatobiliary cancer in four families. Osteosarcoma in three families. Prostate, liver, melanoma, gynaecological, bladder lasix effect on kidneys and brain cancers were detected in two families each. And thyroid, kidney and oral cancer in one family. Moreover, 11 families had relatives affected by an unidentified type of cancer that often coexisted with other cancer types such as colon, leukaemia, breast, liver and prostate.Disease spectrum of FIGC families.

The disease spectrum of FIGC encompassed 19 different phenotypes affecting 208 lasix effect on kidneys family members. The most prevalent phenotype was gastric cancer, detected in 138 of 208, followed by colorectal/colon and breast cancers in 9 of 208. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Disease spectrum of FIGC families. The disease spectrum of FIGC encompassed 19 different phenotypes affecting 208 family members lasix effect on kidneys. The most prevalent phenotype was gastric cancer, detected in 138 of 208, followed by colorectal/colon and breast cancers in 9 of 208.

FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer.Germline and somatic variant discovery across FIGC probandsMultigene panel sequencing analysis of normal-tumour DNA of 50 FIGC probands revealed a total of 10 062 variants (≥1 read covering the alternative allele). Of these, 4998 (49.7%) were detected in normal DNA and lasix effect on kidneys defined as germline variants. The remaining 5064 (50.3%) were called as somatic variants due to exclusive presence in tumour DNA. We started by exploring germline variants, focusing on rare variants in single genes (monogenic hypothesis) or variants co-occurring in several genes, regardless of their population frequency (oligogenic/polygenic hypothesis).Monogenic hypothesis. FIGC-associated rare germline variants and somatic second-hitsTo identify rare germline FIGC-predisposing variants, we performed lasix effect on kidneys a systematic analysis of all germline variants, focusing on their frequency across normal populations and GC cohorts, and sequencing quality.We identified 4998 germline variants in the 50 patients with FIGC (figure 2A).

From the 4998 FIGC germline variants, the genotype frequency of 1038 (20.8%) was available for four 1000 Genomes European populations.28 From the 79.2% of variants absent from 1000 Genomes, only 1.3% (n=53) presented truncating effects, however supported on average by less than four reads, that is, of very low quality and hence confidently discarded. From the 1038 variants present in 1000 Genomes, 121 (11.7%) presented genotypes absent from the four populations screened. Of these 121 variants, only 60 presented the lasix effect on kidneys abovementioned sequencing quality criteria. From these, 43 variants were exclusively detected in FIGC comparing with HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative and SIGC cohorts. With regard to the 17 discarded variants, all were found in at least one HDGC proband and none in SIGC.90 and a call quality >100).

From these, 43 variants presented the RefSeq genotype in the HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative and sporadic GC lasix effect on kidneys cohorts. A final set of 32 germline, rare and high-quality FIGC-exclusive variants were selected by screening the allele frequency of these variants in all ExAC and gnomAD populations available. (B) Germline variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants. P value lasix effect on kidneys was determined by ANOVA statistics. (C) Heatmap and dendrogram of 710 HQ FIGC germline variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level.

White, no detected variants. Purple, detected variants lasix effect on kidneys. (D) Heatmap and dendrogram of 64 genes with the 710 germline variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels. White, genes with no detected variants. Light salmon, genes lasix effect on kidneys with a single variant.

Pink, gene carrying 2–5 distinct variants. Purple, gene with 6–10 distinct variants. Dark purple, gene lasix effect on kidneys with 11–15 distinct variants. ANOVA, analysis of variance. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer.

GC, gastric cancer lasix effect on kidneys. HDGC, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer. HQ, high-quality." class="highwire-fragment fragment-images colorbox-load" rel="gallery-fragment-images-167748251" data-figure-caption="Co-occurrence of rare germline variants does not define a specific germline landscape. (A) Discovery of FIGC lasix effect on kidneys rare germline predisposition variants. A total of 4998 germline variants were detected in normal stomach using multigene panel sequencing.

From these, 1038 were identified by the 1000 Genomes Project, and 121 were absent from four distinct normal European populations. Of these 121 variants, only 60 were classified as variants of high quality (with at least 20 reads for lasix effect on kidneys each allele, a genotype quality >90 and a call quality >100). From these, 43 variants presented the RefSeq genotype in the HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative and sporadic GC cohorts. A final set of 32 germline, rare and high-quality FIGC-exclusive variants were selected by screening the allele frequency of these variants in all ExAC and gnomAD populations available. (B) Germline lasix effect on kidneys variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants.

P value was determined by ANOVA statistics. (C) Heatmap and dendrogram of 710 HQ FIGC germline variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level. White, no detected lasix effect on kidneys variants. Purple, detected variants. (D) Heatmap and dendrogram of 64 genes with the 710 germline variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels.

White, genes lasix effect on kidneys with no detected variants. Light salmon, genes with a single variant. Pink, gene carrying 2–5 distinct variants. Purple, gene with 6–10 distinct variants lasix effect on kidneys. Dark purple, gene with 11–15 distinct variants.

ANOVA, analysis of variance. FIGC, familial lasix effect on kidneys intestinal gastric cancer. GC, gastric cancer. HDGC, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer. HQ, high-quality." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 2 Co-occurrence of rare germline variants lasix effect on kidneys does not define a specific germline landscape.

(A) Discovery of FIGC rare germline predisposition variants. A total of 4998 germline variants were detected in normal stomach using multigene panel sequencing. From these, 1038 were identified by the 1000 Genomes Project, and 121 were lasix effect on kidneys absent from four distinct normal European populations. Of these 121 variants, only 60 were classified as variants of high quality (with at least 20 reads for each allele, a genotype quality >90 and a call quality >100). From these, 43 variants presented the RefSeq genotype in the HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative and sporadic GC cohorts.

A final set of 32 germline, rare and high-quality FIGC-exclusive variants were selected by screening the allele frequency of these variants in all ExAC and gnomAD lasix effect on kidneys populations available. (B) Germline variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants. P value was determined by ANOVA statistics. (C) Heatmap and dendrogram lasix effect on kidneys of 710 HQ FIGC germline variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level. White, no detected variants.

Purple, detected variants. (D) Heatmap and lasix effect on kidneys dendrogram of 64 genes with the 710 germline variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels. White, genes with no detected variants. Light salmon, genes with a single variant. Pink, gene carrying 2–5 distinct variants lasix effect on kidneys.

Purple, gene with 6–10 distinct variants. Dark purple, gene with 11–15 distinct variants. ANOVA, analysis lasix effect on kidneys of variance. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer. GC, gastric cancer.

HDGC, hereditary lasix effect on kidneys diffuse gastric cancer. HQ, high-quality.From the 43 germline, rare and HQ FIGC-exclusive variants, 31 (72.1%) displayed very low allele frequency in all ExAC and gnomAD populations (figure 2A, online supplementary table 3), and were present in 21 of 50 (42%) FIGC probands (7 missense, 7 3’untranslated (UTR), 2 5’UTR, 12 intronic and 3 synonymous in 18 genes. Online supplementary table 4). Fifteen probands lasix effect on kidneys carried a single variant and six exhibited co-occurrence of two or more variants (online supplementary table 5). After excluding variants classified as benign and predicted as intronic, synonymous or not impacting splicing, 12 variants were validated by Sanger sequencing (table 2).Supplemental materialSupplemental materialSupplemental materialView this table:Table 2 FIGC rare germline variants validated by Sanger sequencingA missense variant in PMS1 (c.224C>T), predicted as pathogenic, deleterious and probably damaging by FATHMM, SIFT and PolyPhen, respectively (table 2, online supplementary table 3), was found in family P1 (table 1, online supplementary table 4).

The probands, who developed an MSS IGC at 59 years, had an FDR with GC at 80 and two other FDR and SDR with unidentified cancers at 50 and 75 years, respectively. The only supporting evidence for the role of this variant in lasix effect on kidneys FIGC was its COSMIC record as somatic in one GC sample (COSM6198026) (online supplementary table 3).The proband of family P27 presented three germline variants of uncertain significance, two in SMAD4 (c.424+5G>A. C.454+38G>C) and one in PRSS1 (c.201-99G>C) (online supplementary table 4). Variants c.424+5G>A in SMAD4 and c.201–99G>C in PRSS1 were the only intronic variants predicted to disrupt RNA splicing (table 2, online supplementary tables 3 and 5,). In particular, SMAD4 variant c.424+5G>A decreases the confidence of a donor lasix effect on kidneys splice site, which may lead to intron 3 retention, a premature termination codon and generation of a 142 amino acid truncated protein.

On the other hand, PRSS1 variant c.201-99G>C creates a new, high-confidence acceptor splice site within intron 2, which may lead to a truncated 69 amino acid protein. Proband P27 developed an MSS IGC at age 64 and had family history of GC, gastric ulcer, laryngotracheal, gynaecological and hepatobiliary cancers (table 1, online supplementary table 4). The presence of these phenotypes seems to exclude juvenile polyposis and hereditary pancreatitis as underlying syndromes of this family, lasix effect on kidneys but could support a potential role for SMAD4 together with PRSS1 in FIGC.We then screened the primary tumours of P1 and P27 FIGC probands for somatic second-hit inactivating mechanisms (LOH, somatic mutation) in germline-affected genes. None of the two FIGC probands showed evidence of deleterious somatic variants nor LOH of the wild-type allele of the germline targeted genes (data not shown).Although interesting, these findings are insufficient to support the monogenic hypothesis for FIGC and a potentially causal role for the abovementioned affected genes.Oligogenic/polygenic hypothesis. Co-occurrence of rare germline variants determines somatic landscapes of FIGC tumoursWe then proceeded with the oligogenic/polygenic hypothesis, which takes into consideration the co-occurrence of germline variants, regardless of their population frequency, as a risk factor for this disease, which would determine the subsequent somatic events necessary for malignant transformation.We categorised the 50 FIGC probands according to the presence of rare germline variants.

Families with no lasix effect on kidneys variants (n=30). Families with a single variant (n=14). And families with multiple variants (n=6). To understand the germline lasix effect on kidneys and somatic variant burden for each of these three FIGC classes, we applied the previously described quality criteria obtaining 710 HQ germline variants and 344 HQ somatic variants. The average number of HQ germline variants was identical across the three classes of FIGC families (75.7, 77.4 and 74.5 for families without (0), with one (1) or more than one (>1) rare germline variants, respectively.

Figure 2B). Germline landscape unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed no associations between variants or variant-bearing genes and a particular lasix effect on kidneys FIGC family class (figure 2C,D).Concerning the somatic variant burden, no significant differences were observed across the three FIGC classes (15.0, 13.8 and 11.2 for families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants, respectively. Figure 3A). Again, no clustering of specific variants/genes and particular FIGC classes was observed (figure 3B,C).1 rare germline variants. P value lasix effect on kidneys was determined by ANOVA statistics.

(B) Heatmap and dendrogram of 344 FIGC somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level. White, no detected variants. Orange, detected lasix effect on kidneys variants. (C) Heatmap and dendrogram of 46 genes with the 344 somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels. White, gene with no detected variants.

Yellow, gene with a single variant lasix effect on kidneys. Orange, gene carrying 2–5 distinct variants. Light brown, gene with 6–10 distinct variants. Brown, gene lasix effect on kidneys with 11–15 distinct variants. (D) Somatic variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants subdivided according to MSI status.

P value was determined by ANOVA statistics. ANOVA, analysis of lasix effect on kidneys variance. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer. HQ, high-quality. MSI, microsatellite instable lasix effect on kidneys.

MSS, microsatellite stable." class="highwire-fragment fragment-images colorbox-load" rel="gallery-fragment-images-167748251" data-figure-caption="Rare germline variants are not major determinants of FIGC somatic events. (A) Somatic variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants. P value was determined lasix effect on kidneys by ANOVA statistics. (B) Heatmap and dendrogram of 344 FIGC somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level. White, no detected variants.

Orange, detected variants lasix effect on kidneys. (C) Heatmap and dendrogram of 46 genes with the 344 somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels. White, gene with no detected variants. Yellow, gene with a single lasix effect on kidneys variant. Orange, gene carrying 2–5 distinct variants.

Light brown, gene with 6–10 distinct variants. Brown, gene with 11–15 distinct variants lasix effect on kidneys. (D) Somatic variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants subdivided according to MSI status. P value was determined by ANOVA statistics. ANOVA, analysis of lasix effect on kidneys variance.

FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer. HQ, high-quality. MSI, microsatellite instable lasix effect on kidneys. MSS, microsatellite stable." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 3 Rare germline variants are not major determinants of FIGC somatic events. (A) Somatic variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants.

P value was determined by lasix effect on kidneys ANOVA statistics. (B) Heatmap and dendrogram of 344 FIGC somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level. White, no detected variants. Orange, detected lasix effect on kidneys variants. (C) Heatmap and dendrogram of 46 genes with the 344 somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels.

White, gene with no detected variants. Yellow, gene with a single lasix effect on kidneys variant. Orange, gene carrying 2–5 distinct variants. Light brown, gene with 6–10 distinct variants. Brown, gene with 11–15 distinct lasix effect on kidneys variants.

(D) Somatic variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants subdivided according to MSI status. P value was determined by ANOVA statistics. ANOVA, analysis lasix effect on kidneys of variance. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer. HQ, high-quality.

MSI, microsatellite lasix effect on kidneys instable. MSS, microsatellite stable.We verified that 38% of the FIGC tumours in our series displayed the MSI phenotype, and further investigated whether MSI could influence the somatic variant burden and landscape in families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants. After subdividing each FIGC class according to its MSI status, no significant differences were observed both in terms of somatic variant burden and landscape between categories (figure 3B–D). Nevertheless, we observed that among FIGC families with multiple rare germline variants (>1), MSI tumours showed an average number of HQ somatic variants twofold lasix effect on kidneys higher than that of MSS tumours (17 vs 10 HQ somatic variants per case, respectively. Figure 3D, online supplementary figure 1A).

This observation prompted us to explore the influence of rare germline variants, independently of their number, on tumour instability and consequent somatic variant burden. Despite the lack of statistical significance, we observed an enrichment of lasix effect on kidneys MSI tumours in FIGC families carrying rare germline variants comparing with MSI tumours from families lacking rare germline variants (online supplementary figure 1B). Concerning the average of somatic variants, whereas MSI and MSS tumours from FIGC lacking rare germline variants displayed a similar average number, there was a non-significant trend for higher average number of HQ somatic variants in MSI tumours versus MSS tumours from FIGC families with rare germline variants (≥1. Online supplementary figure 1C).Supplemental materialAlthough our data did not support the hypothesis that co-occurrence of rare germline variants is a major determinant of FIGC-related somatic landscapes, these pinpointed a potential correlation between the coexistence of rare and common germline variants, high average number of somatic variants and MSI phenotype in FIGC.FIGC is genetically distinct from SIGC and from HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negativeSince the late age of onset in FIGC probands and their relatives makes it hard to distinguish bona fide FIGCs from SIGCs, we compared the age of onset of FIGC probands with the age of onset of a series of SIGC cases. We found that FIGC probands developed GC approximately lasix effect on kidneys 10 years earlier than patients with SIGC (p=4.5E-03.

Figure 4E).FIGC is a genetic entity distinct from SIGC. (A) Principal component analysis of genes with germline variants. (B) Principal component analysis of lasix effect on kidneys genes with somatic variants. (C) Frequency of genes with germline or somatic variants enriched in FIGC cases in comparison with SIGC cases. Purple for genes with germline events and orange for genes with somatic events.

(D) Heatmap and dendrogram of a panel of genes with the highest frequency of germline lasix effect on kidneys and/or somatic variants in FIGC (n=50) versus SIGC (n=47). (E) Age at diagnosis of FIGC (n=50) and SIGC cases (n=47). (F) Average number of somatic variants detected in FIGC (n=50) and SIGC cases (n=47). White, gene with no lasix effect on kidneys variants. Purple, gene with germline variants.

Orange, gene with somatic variants. Red, gene with germline lasix effect on kidneys and somatic variants. P values calculated with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer. SIGC, sporadic intestinal gastric cancer, PC1, principal component lasix effect on kidneys 1.

PC2, principal component 2." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 4 FIGC is a genetic entity distinct from SIGC. (A) Principal component analysis of genes with germline variants. (B) Principal component analysis of genes with somatic variants lasix effect on kidneys. (C) Frequency of genes with germline or somatic variants enriched in FIGC cases in comparison with SIGC cases. Purple for genes with germline events and orange for genes with somatic events.

(D) Heatmap and dendrogram of a panel of genes with the highest frequency of germline and/or somatic variants in FIGC (n=50) versus lasix effect on kidneys SIGC (n=47). (E) Age at diagnosis of FIGC (n=50) and SIGC cases (n=47). (F) Average number of somatic variants detected in FIGC (n=50) and SIGC cases (n=47). White, gene with lasix effect on kidneys no variants. Purple, gene with germline variants.

Orange, gene with somatic variants. Red, gene lasix effect on kidneys with germline and somatic variants. P values calculated with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer. SIGC, sporadic lasix effect on kidneys intestinal gastric cancer, PC1, principal component 1.

PC2, principal component 2.We next explored whether these FIGC and SIGC were also distinct at the germline and/or somatic levels. Principal component analysis revealed that certain genes were differentially associated with FIGCs and SIGCs (figure 4A,B). Specifically, common germline variants in TP53 were present in more than 50% of FIGC probands, while only 11% of lasix effect on kidneys SIGC cases presented these germline variants (figure 4A,C). At the somatic level, the frequency of BRCA2, ATM, FOXF1, FHIT, SDHB, MSH6, CTNNA1 and PXN could distinguish FIGC from SIGC tumours, with more than 50% of FIGC displaying common variants in these genes, as compared with very low frequencies in SIGC (figure 4B,C).By combining all germline and somatic landscapes of 50 FIGCs and 47 SIGCs focusing only on the abovementioned genes, and using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, two main clusters were evidenced separating most FIGCs from SIGCs (figure 4D). Whereas FIGCs carried both germline and somatic variants in TP53, BRCA2, ATM, FOXF1, FHIT, SDHB, MSH6, CTNNA1 and PXN genes, SIGCs lacked TP53 and FHIT germline and somatic variants and mainly presented BRCA2, ATM, FOXF1, SDHB, MSH6, CTNNA1 and PXN somatic variants.Further supporting that FIGC represents a different entity likely evolving for longer than SIGCs is the fact that FIGC tumours presented statistically significantly more somatic common variants than SIGC tumours (p=4.2E-06), even if arising from patients 10 years younger on average (figure 4E,F).To further understand whether FIGC is a genetic entity also distinct from HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative, we compared the germline and somatic landscapes of 7 FIGCs and 17 HDGCs sequenced with the same Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) panel.

We verified that indeed FIGC and HDGC also display considerable lasix effect on kidneys differences between germline and somatic landscapes (online supplementary figure 2)(). However, the low number of FIGC cases possible to analyse, which was due to sequencing panel differences, hampers more formal conclusions.Overall, our results suggest that FIGC, rather than a monogenic disease, is likely a polygenic disease with distinctive germline and somatic landscapes from SIGC and HDGC-CDH1-negative.DiscussionFIGC presents an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of IGC, without gastric polyposis, and has been clinically defined by analogy to the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC.9 However, lack of novel data supporting familial aggregation of IGC at a given age of onset as well as the non-existence of tumour spectrum descriptions have impeded the redefinition of FIGC testing criteria, useful for identification and management of these families.The primary strength of this study is the use of a large homogeneous cohort of probands with IGC, familial aggregation of GC, detailed personal/family history, age of disease onset and disease spectrum. This series does not present clinical criteria compatible with any other gastrointestinal cancer-associated syndrome, is clearly enriched in GC and mainly of intestinal type, which suggests this is the first data-driven testing criteria for FIGC families. We propose that any family presenting two GC cases, one confirmed of intestinal lasix effect on kidneys histology, independently of age, and with or without colorectal cancer, breast cancer or gastric ulcers in other family members, could be considered FIGC.Besides potential testing criteria, our study also reported the first large-scale sequencing analysis of the germline and somatic landscapes of FIGC and respective comparisons with comparable landscapes of SIGC and HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative. We used these data to explore the unknown inherited nature of FIGC.

Among the FIGC-exclusive germline rare variants found, the missense PMS1 c.224C>T variant was the only one predicted as pathogenic in family P1. Deleterious variants in this DNA mismatch repair protein (PMS1, OMIM:600258) can be found in HNPCC families, either alone or co-occurring with mutations in other HNPCC-related genes.32 33 However, the real contribution of PMS1 germline lasix effect on kidneys mutations for HNPCC predisposition is still debatable. Liu et al33 detected PMS1 and MSH2 germline mutations in an HNPCC proband with an MSI tumour, and observed that only the MSH2 germline mutation was shared with another member of the family affected with colorectal cancer, thus demonstrating that MSH2 is the real predisposing gene to colorectal cancer in this family. Notwithstanding, they postulated that the PMS1 mutation could contribute to the unusual number of lung cancer cases in this HNPCC family.33 Our FIGC proband (P1) carrying a PMS1 germline variant displayed an MSI-low tumour, consistent with the fact that Pms1-deficient mice do not show an increased mutation rate (MSI) in the colonic epithelium.34 Although we lack full evidence for the potentially causative role of this PMS1 variant in family P1, namely a second-hit in the tumour and segregation analysis, this remains an open possibility. The same applied to family P27, where potentially truncating variants are simultaneously found in SMAD4 and PRSS1, but no second somatic-hits are found in these genes lasix effect on kidneys.

Overall, these findings do not strongly support a monogenic nature for FIGC, at least as evident as that seen for CDH1-associated HDGC or GAPPS.In the last decade, several studies have integrated large-scale normal and tumour sequencing data to ascertain the impact of germline variation on tumour evolution.35–38 For example, Carter et al36 identified germline variants that can either dramatically increase the frequency of somatic mutations or influence the site where a tumour develops. Others have shown that rare germline truncations in cancer susceptibility genes, including BRCA1, BRCA2, FANCM and MSH6, are significantly associated with increased somatic mutation frequencies in specific cancer types, suggesting that germline and somatic levels are intrinsically linked.37 Our findings revealed that, independently of the presence of rare germline variants, FIGC families displayed similar germline and somatic variant burden and landscapes, suggesting that this type of inherited variation may not be a major determinant of tumour development in these families.

(2) familial aggregation Purchase propecia canada of GC can you get lasix without a prescription. (3) family history of cancer, other than gastric. (4) negative genetic test for germline CDH1 coding sequence mutations (exclusion of HDGC).

And (5) negative genetic test for germline for the promoter 1B of APC (exclusion of GAPPS) can you get lasix without a prescription. The 17 HDGC probands were negative for CDH1 germline coding mutations and selected as a control group. Forty-seven patients with SIGC were collected in Portugal.Multigene panel sequencing, variant calling and filteringDNA from normal gastric mucosa (germline) and tumour tissue from 50 FIGC and 17 HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative probands were sequenced using three Illumina MiSeq custom panels.

TruSeq Custom Amplicon Assay 1, TruSeq Custom Amplicon Assay 2 and Nextera custom panel (online supplementary table 1) can you get lasix without a prescription. The selection of genes deposited in each panel was based on their implication in upper gastrointestinal tract cancers or in cancer susceptibility syndromes identified through literature review (online supplementary table 2). FASTQ files were aligned to the RefSeq Human Genome GRCh38 using bwa-mem, and variants were called using Samtools.24 25 Called variants were defined as germline or somatic by normal-tumour pair comparison and annotated with Ensembl and Catalogue Of Somatic Mutations In Cancer (COSMIC (FATHMM- Functional Analysis through Hidden Markov Models).26 27 High-quality (HQ) germline or somatic variants were defined as presenting ≥20 reads per allele and genotype quality ≥90 and call quality ≥100.

Next, all single nucleotide polymorphism database (dbSNP) identifiers available for FIGC can you get lasix without a prescription germline variants (regardless of quality criteria) were screened in four European populations from 1000 Genomes. (1) 107 normal individuals from Tuscany (Italy, TSI). (2) 91 normal individuals from Great Britain (GBR).

(3) 99 can you get lasix without a prescription normal individuals from Finland (FIN). And (4) 107 normal individuals from Spain (IBS).28 Germline variants without dbSNP identifiers available in the 1000 Genomes were screened using Ensembl VEP for truncating consequences. Detected truncating variants presented on average less than four reads, that is, were of low quality and discarded.

FIGC germline, rare HQ exclusive variants were selected if they (1) displayed genotypes in FIGCs distinct from GBR, FIN and IBS populations can you get lasix without a prescription and below 1% in the TSI population. (2) presented ≥20 reads per allele, genotype quality ≥90 and call quality ≥100. (3) displayed genotypes distinct from HDGCs and SIGCs.

And (4) presented allele frequency in ExAC and gnomAD populations below 1%.29Supplemental materialSupplemental materialValidation of FIGC germline, rare HQ exclusive variants by Sanger sequencingTwelve out of 32 FIGC germline, rare HQ exclusive variants were validated by PCR-Sanger can you get lasix without a prescription sequencing. Briefly, 20–50 ng of DNA from normal and matched tumour was amplified using Multiplex PCR Kit (Qiagen) and custom primers flanking each variant. PCR products were purified with ExoSAP-IT Express (Applied Biosystems) and sequenced on an ABI3100 Genetic Analyzer using BigDye Terminator V.3.1 Cycle Sequencing Kit (Applied Biosystems).Intronic germline variants were analysed using the splice site prediction software NetGene2 V.2.4.30Somatic second-hit analysisLoss of heterozygosity (LOH) and somatic second mutations were determined by calculating the variant allele frequency (VAF) and screening genes with FIGC germline, rare HQ exclusive variants, respectively.

In particular, VAF was calculated by dividing the number of reads for the variant allele by the total number of reads both for the normal and for the corresponding can you get lasix without a prescription tumour samples. LOH was defined when more than 20% increase of VAF over normal was observed.Germline and somatic landscape analysis of 50 FIGC casesFIGC germline and somatic landscapes were analysed on a per-variant and per-gene basis, considering the number of FIGC germline, rare HQ exclusive variants detected per proband (0, 1 or >1). The similarities/differences for the germline and somatic variant and gene landscapes per FIGC class were analysed using unsupervised hierarchical clustering using R package ggplot2 for heatmap and dendrogram construction.31 For somatic variant/gene landscape analysis, FIGC classes were also divided according to microsatellite instable status and compared using analysis of variance statistics with R.

The number of microsatellite instable (MSI) and microsatellite stable (MSS) tumours per FIGC class was compared using Pearson’s χ2 test.Comparison of germline and somatic landscapes for FIGC, SIGC and HDGCVCF files obtained from whole genome sequencing (Complete Genomics platform) of 47 SIGCs and VCF files of 17 HDGCs were analysed to detect germline and somatic variants, using the same germline/somatic variant definition and sequencing can you get lasix without a prescription quality criteria previously described for FIGC cases. Of note, due to the differential resolution between whole genome sequencing and targeted sequencing, only variants detected in the 47 SIGCs in the same regions targeted by the custom panels were selected for downstream analysis.Germline and somatic landscapes of FIGC, SIGC and HDGC cases were performed on a per-gene basis. Each gene was classified as presenting 0 or ≥1 germline/somatic variants.

Germline and somatic joint landscape was can you get lasix without a prescription defined by counting the number of germline and somatic variants for each gene, which was classified as displaying no germline or somatic variants. ‰¥1 germline and 0 somatic variants. 0 germline and ≥1 somatic variants.

Or ≥1 germline and ≥1 can you get lasix without a prescription somatic variants. Results were plotted in a heatmap and a dendrogram, and principal component analysis was performed using R. The frequency of genes with germline/somatic variants in FIGCs, SIGCs and HDGCs was calculated, and genes with a frequency difference ≥50% were represented in a bar plot and in a heatmap using R.ResultsAge of onset and disease spectrum in FIGCOf the 50 FIGC probands (table 1), 18 were female and 32 were male.

The mean age at diagnosis was can you get lasix without a prescription 71.8±8.0 years. From the 50 families depicted in table 1, 5 (10%) had >1 FDR with GC (mean age. 68.8±7.5 years).

14 (28%) had concomitantly FDR and SDR can you get lasix without a prescription or FDR and third-degree relatives with GC (mean age. 68.7±8.4 years). 29 (58%) had a single FDR with GC (mean age.

73.6±7.2 years) can you get lasix without a prescription. And 2 (4%) had only SDR affected with GC (mean. 74±15.6 years).View this table:Table 1 Clinical characteristics of FIGC probands and their family historyWhen considering the disease spectrum in these FIGC families, 19 different phenotypes have been observed affecting 208 family members (figure 1, table 1).

The most prevalent phenotype was GC, detected in 138 of 208 can you get lasix without a prescription (66.3%) family members. 50 probands with IGC and 88 additional patients with unknown GC histology. The second and third most prevalent phenotypes were colorectal/colon and breast cancer observed in nine patients from seven families.

Of note, eight patients from six families were affected with gastric ulcer, a non-cancerous can you get lasix without a prescription lesion, which is the third most common disease phenotype in this cohort. Besides these phenotypes, positive history of lung cancer was observed in six families. Leukaemia in five families.

Laryngotracheal and hepatobiliary can you get lasix without a prescription cancer in four families. Osteosarcoma in three families. Prostate, liver, melanoma, gynaecological, bladder and brain cancers were detected in two families each.

And thyroid, can you get lasix without a prescription kidney and oral cancer in one family. Moreover, 11 families had relatives affected by an unidentified type of cancer that often coexisted with other cancer types such as colon, leukaemia, breast, liver and prostate.Disease spectrum of FIGC families. The disease spectrum of FIGC encompassed 19 different phenotypes affecting 208 family members.

The most prevalent phenotype was gastric cancer, detected in 138 of 208, followed by colorectal/colon and breast cancers can you get lasix without a prescription in 9 of 208. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Disease spectrum of FIGC families. The disease spectrum of FIGC encompassed 19 different phenotypes affecting 208 family members.

The most prevalent phenotype was gastric cancer, detected in 138 of 208, can you get lasix without a prescription followed by colorectal/colon and breast cancers in 9 of 208. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer.Germline and somatic variant discovery across FIGC probandsMultigene panel sequencing analysis of normal-tumour DNA of 50 FIGC probands revealed a total of 10 062 variants (≥1 read covering the alternative allele). Of these, 4998 (49.7%) were detected in normal DNA and defined as germline variants.

The remaining 5064 (50.3%) were called as somatic variants due to exclusive presence in tumour can you get lasix without a prescription DNA. We started by exploring germline variants, focusing on rare variants in single genes (monogenic hypothesis) or variants co-occurring in several genes, regardless of their population frequency (oligogenic/polygenic hypothesis).Monogenic hypothesis. FIGC-associated rare germline variants and somatic second-hitsTo identify rare germline FIGC-predisposing variants, we performed a systematic analysis of all germline variants, focusing on their frequency across normal populations and GC cohorts, and sequencing quality.We identified 4998 germline variants in the 50 patients with FIGC (figure 2A).

From the 4998 FIGC germline variants, the genotype frequency of 1038 (20.8%) was available for four 1000 can you get lasix without a prescription Genomes European populations.28 From the 79.2% of variants absent from 1000 Genomes, only 1.3% (n=53) presented truncating effects, however supported on average by less than four reads, that is, of very low quality and hence confidently discarded. From the 1038 variants present in 1000 Genomes, 121 (11.7%) presented genotypes absent from the four populations screened. Of these 121 variants, only 60 presented the abovementioned sequencing quality criteria.

From these, 43 variants were exclusively detected in FIGC comparing with can you get lasix without a prescription HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative and SIGC cohorts. With regard to the 17 discarded variants, all were found in at least one HDGC proband and none in SIGC.90 and a call quality >100). From these, 43 variants presented the RefSeq genotype in the HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative and sporadic GC cohorts.

A final set of 32 germline, rare and high-quality FIGC-exclusive variants were selected by screening the allele frequency of these variants in all ExAC and can you get lasix without a prescription gnomAD populations available. (B) Germline variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants. P value was determined by ANOVA statistics.

(C) Heatmap and dendrogram of 710 HQ FIGC germline variants of can you get lasix without a prescription FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level. White, no detected variants. Purple, detected variants.

(D) Heatmap and dendrogram of 64 genes with the 710 germline variants of FIGC can you get lasix without a prescription family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels. White, genes with no detected variants. Light salmon, genes with a single variant.

Pink, gene carrying 2–5 distinct can you get lasix without a prescription variants. Purple, gene with 6–10 distinct variants. Dark purple, gene with 11–15 distinct variants.

ANOVA, analysis can you get lasix without a prescription of variance. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer. GC, gastric cancer.

HDGC, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer can you get lasix without a prescription. HQ, high-quality." class="highwire-fragment fragment-images colorbox-load" rel="gallery-fragment-images-167748251" data-figure-caption="Co-occurrence of rare germline variants does not define a specific germline landscape. (A) Discovery of FIGC rare germline predisposition variants.

A total of 4998 can you get lasix without a prescription germline variants were detected in normal stomach using multigene panel sequencing. From these, 1038 were identified by the 1000 Genomes Project, and 121 were absent from four distinct normal European populations. Of these 121 variants, only 60 were classified as variants of high quality (with at least 20 reads for each allele, a genotype quality >90 and a call quality >100).

From these, 43 variants presented the RefSeq genotype in the HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative can you get lasix without a prescription and sporadic GC cohorts. A final set of 32 germline, rare and high-quality FIGC-exclusive variants were selected by screening the allele frequency of these variants in all ExAC and gnomAD populations available. (B) Germline variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants.

P value was determined by can you get lasix without a prescription ANOVA statistics. (C) Heatmap and dendrogram of 710 HQ FIGC germline variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level. White, no detected variants.

Purple, detected can you get lasix without a prescription variants. (D) Heatmap and dendrogram of 64 genes with the 710 germline variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels. White, genes with no detected variants.

Light salmon, can you get lasix without a prescription genes with a single variant. Pink, gene carrying 2–5 distinct variants. Purple, gene with 6–10 distinct variants.

Dark purple, gene can you get lasix without a prescription with 11–15 distinct variants. ANOVA, analysis of variance. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer.

GC, gastric can you get lasix without a prescription cancer. HDGC, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer. HQ, high-quality." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 2 Co-occurrence of rare germline variants does not define a specific germline landscape.

(A) Discovery of FIGC rare can you get lasix without a prescription germline predisposition variants. A total of 4998 germline variants were detected in normal stomach using multigene panel sequencing. From these, 1038 were identified by the 1000 Genomes Project, and 121 were absent from four distinct normal European populations.

Of these 121 variants, only 60 were classified as variants of high quality (with at least 20 reads for each allele, a can you get lasix without a prescription genotype quality >90 and a call quality >100). From these, 43 variants presented the RefSeq genotype in the HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative and sporadic GC cohorts. A final set of 32 germline, rare and high-quality FIGC-exclusive variants were selected by screening the allele frequency of these variants in all ExAC and gnomAD populations available.

(B) Germline variant burden of FIGC families with 0, can you get lasix without a prescription 1 or >1 rare germline variants. P value was determined by ANOVA statistics. (C) Heatmap and dendrogram of 710 HQ FIGC germline variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level.

White, no detected can you get lasix without a prescription variants. Purple, detected variants. (D) Heatmap and dendrogram of 64 genes with the 710 germline variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels.

White, genes can you get lasix without a prescription with no detected variants. Light salmon, genes with a single variant. Pink, gene carrying 2–5 distinct variants.

Purple, gene with can you get lasix without a prescription 6–10 distinct variants. Dark purple, gene with 11–15 distinct variants. ANOVA, analysis of variance.

FIGC, familial intestinal can you get lasix without a prescription gastric cancer. GC, gastric cancer. HDGC, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer.

HQ, high-quality.From the 43 germline, rare and HQ FIGC-exclusive variants, 31 (72.1%) displayed very low allele frequency in all ExAC and gnomAD populations (figure 2A, online supplementary table 3), and were present in 21 of 50 (42%) FIGC probands (7 missense, can you get lasix without a prescription 7 3’untranslated (UTR), 2 5’UTR, 12 intronic and 3 synonymous in 18 genes. Online supplementary table 4). Fifteen probands carried a single variant and six exhibited co-occurrence of two or more variants (online supplementary table 5).

After excluding variants classified as benign and predicted as intronic, synonymous or not impacting splicing, 12 variants were validated by Sanger sequencing (table 2).Supplemental materialSupplemental materialSupplemental can you get lasix without a prescription materialView this table:Table 2 FIGC rare germline variants validated by Sanger sequencingA missense variant in PMS1 (c.224C>T), predicted as pathogenic, deleterious and probably damaging by FATHMM, SIFT and PolyPhen, respectively (table 2, online supplementary table 3), was found in family P1 (table 1, online supplementary table 4). The probands, who developed an MSS IGC at 59 years, had an FDR with GC at 80 and two other FDR and SDR with unidentified cancers at 50 and 75 years, respectively. The only supporting evidence for the role of this variant in FIGC was its COSMIC record as somatic in one GC sample (COSM6198026) (online supplementary table 3).The proband of family P27 presented three germline variants of uncertain significance, two in SMAD4 (c.424+5G>A.

C.454+38G>C) and one can you get lasix without a prescription in PRSS1 (c.201-99G>C) (online supplementary table 4). Variants c.424+5G>A in SMAD4 and c.201–99G>C in PRSS1 were the only intronic variants predicted to disrupt RNA splicing (table 2, online supplementary tables 3 and 5,). In particular, SMAD4 variant c.424+5G>A decreases the confidence of a donor splice site, which may lead to intron 3 retention, a premature termination codon and generation of a 142 amino acid truncated protein.

On the other hand, PRSS1 variant c.201-99G>C creates can you get lasix without a prescription a new, high-confidence acceptor splice site within intron 2, which may lead to a truncated 69 amino acid protein. Proband P27 developed an MSS IGC at age 64 and had family history of GC, gastric ulcer, laryngotracheal, gynaecological and hepatobiliary cancers (table 1, online supplementary table 4). The presence of these phenotypes seems to exclude juvenile polyposis and hereditary pancreatitis as underlying syndromes of this family, but could support a potential role for SMAD4 together with PRSS1 in FIGC.We then screened the primary tumours of P1 and P27 FIGC probands for somatic second-hit inactivating mechanisms (LOH, somatic mutation) in germline-affected genes.

None of the two FIGC probands showed evidence of deleterious somatic variants nor LOH of the wild-type allele of the germline targeted genes (data not shown).Although interesting, these findings are insufficient to can you get lasix without a prescription support the monogenic hypothesis for FIGC and a potentially causal role for the abovementioned affected genes.Oligogenic/polygenic hypothesis. Co-occurrence of rare germline variants determines somatic landscapes of FIGC tumoursWe then proceeded with the oligogenic/polygenic hypothesis, which takes into consideration the co-occurrence of germline variants, regardless of their population frequency, as a risk factor for this disease, which would determine the subsequent somatic events necessary for malignant transformation.We categorised the 50 FIGC probands according to the presence of rare germline variants. Families with no variants (n=30).

Families with a can you get lasix without a prescription single variant (n=14). And families with multiple variants (n=6). To understand the germline and somatic variant burden for each of these three FIGC classes, we applied the previously described quality criteria obtaining 710 HQ germline variants and 344 HQ somatic variants.

The average can you get lasix without a prescription number of HQ germline variants was identical across the three classes of FIGC families (75.7, 77.4 and 74.5 for families without (0), with one (1) or more than one (>1) rare germline variants, respectively. Figure 2B). Germline landscape unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed no associations between variants or variant-bearing genes and a particular FIGC family class (figure 2C,D).Concerning the somatic variant burden, no significant differences were observed across the three FIGC classes (15.0, 13.8 and 11.2 for families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants, respectively.

Figure 3A) can you get lasix without a prescription. Again, no clustering of specific variants/genes and particular FIGC classes was observed (figure 3B,C).1 rare germline variants. P value was determined by ANOVA statistics.

(B) Heatmap and dendrogram of 344 FIGC can you get lasix without a prescription somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level. White, no detected variants. Orange, detected variants.

(C) Heatmap and dendrogram of 46 genes with can you get lasix without a prescription the 344 somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels. White, gene with no detected variants. Yellow, gene with a single variant.

Orange, gene carrying 2–5 distinct can you get lasix without a prescription variants. Light brown, gene with 6–10 distinct variants. Brown, gene with 11–15 distinct variants.

(D) Somatic variant burden of can you get lasix without a prescription FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants subdivided according to MSI status. P value was determined by ANOVA statistics. ANOVA, analysis of variance.

FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer can you get lasix without a prescription. HQ, high-quality. MSI, microsatellite instable.

MSS, microsatellite stable." class="highwire-fragment fragment-images colorbox-load" rel="gallery-fragment-images-167748251" data-figure-caption="Rare can you get lasix without a prescription germline variants are not major determinants of FIGC somatic events. (A) Somatic variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants. P value was determined by ANOVA statistics.

(B) Heatmap can you get lasix without a prescription and dendrogram of 344 FIGC somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level. White, no detected variants. Orange, detected variants.

(C) Heatmap and dendrogram of 46 genes with the can you get lasix without a prescription 344 somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels. White, gene with no detected variants. Yellow, gene with a single variant.

Orange, gene carrying can you get lasix without a prescription 2–5 distinct variants. Light brown, gene with 6–10 distinct variants. Brown, gene with 11–15 distinct variants.

(D) Somatic variant burden of FIGC can you get lasix without a prescription families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants subdivided according to MSI status. P value was determined by ANOVA statistics. ANOVA, analysis of variance.

FIGC, familial can you get lasix without a prescription intestinal gastric cancer. HQ, high-quality. MSI, microsatellite instable.

MSS, microsatellite can you get lasix without a prescription stable." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 3 Rare germline variants are not major determinants of FIGC somatic events. (A) Somatic variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants. P value was determined by ANOVA statistics.

(B) Heatmap and dendrogram of 344 FIGC can you get lasix without a prescription somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression level. White, no detected variants. Orange, detected variants.

(C) Heatmap and dendrogram of 46 can you get lasix without a prescription genes with the 344 somatic variants of FIGC family classes (Z-score normalised expression levels. White, gene with no detected variants. Yellow, gene with a single variant.

Orange, gene carrying can you get lasix without a prescription 2–5 distinct variants. Light brown, gene with 6–10 distinct variants. Brown, gene with 11–15 distinct variants.

(D) Somatic can you get lasix without a prescription variant burden of FIGC families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants subdivided according to MSI status. P value was determined by ANOVA statistics. ANOVA, analysis of variance.

FIGC, familial intestinal gastric can you get lasix without a prescription cancer. HQ, high-quality. MSI, microsatellite instable.

MSS, microsatellite stable.We verified that 38% can you get lasix without a prescription of the FIGC tumours in our series displayed the MSI phenotype, and further investigated whether MSI could influence the somatic variant burden and landscape in families with 0, 1 or >1 rare germline variants. After subdividing each FIGC class according to its MSI status, no significant differences were observed both in terms of somatic variant burden and landscape between categories (figure 3B–D). Nevertheless, we observed that among FIGC families with multiple rare germline variants (>1), MSI tumours showed an average number of HQ somatic variants twofold higher than that of MSS tumours (17 vs 10 HQ somatic variants per case, respectively.

Figure 3D, online supplementary can you get lasix without a prescription figure 1A). This observation prompted us to explore the influence of rare germline variants, independently of their number, on tumour instability and consequent somatic variant burden. Despite the lack of statistical significance, we observed an enrichment of MSI tumours in FIGC families carrying rare germline variants comparing with MSI tumours from families lacking rare germline variants (online supplementary figure 1B).

Concerning the average of somatic variants, whereas MSI and MSS tumours from FIGC lacking can you get lasix without a prescription rare germline variants displayed a similar average number, there was a non-significant trend for higher average number of HQ somatic variants in MSI tumours versus MSS tumours from FIGC families with rare germline variants (≥1. Online supplementary figure 1C).Supplemental materialAlthough our data did not support the hypothesis that co-occurrence of rare germline variants is a major determinant of FIGC-related somatic landscapes, these pinpointed a potential correlation between the coexistence of rare and common germline variants, high average number of somatic variants and MSI phenotype in FIGC.FIGC is genetically distinct from SIGC and from HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negativeSince the late age of onset in FIGC probands and their relatives makes it hard to distinguish bona fide FIGCs from SIGCs, we compared the age of onset of FIGC probands with the age of onset of a series of SIGC cases. We found that FIGC probands developed GC approximately 10 years earlier than patients with SIGC (p=4.5E-03.

Figure 4E).FIGC can you get lasix without a prescription is a genetic entity distinct from SIGC. (A) Principal component analysis of genes with germline variants. (B) Principal component analysis of genes with somatic variants.

(C) Frequency can you get lasix without a prescription of genes with germline or somatic variants enriched in FIGC cases in comparison with SIGC cases. Purple for genes with germline events and orange for genes with somatic events. (D) Heatmap and dendrogram of a panel of genes with the highest frequency of germline and/or somatic variants in FIGC (n=50) versus SIGC (n=47).

(E) Age at diagnosis of FIGC (n=50) and SIGC can you get lasix without a prescription cases (n=47). (F) Average number of somatic variants detected in FIGC (n=50) and SIGC cases (n=47). White, gene with no variants.

Purple, gene with germline variants can you get lasix without a prescription. Orange, gene with somatic variants. Red, gene with germline and somatic variants.

P values calculated with can you get lasix without a prescription Wilcoxon signed-rank test. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer. SIGC, sporadic intestinal gastric cancer, PC1, principal component 1.

PC2, principal can you get lasix without a prescription component 2." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 4 FIGC is a genetic entity distinct from SIGC. (A) Principal component analysis of genes with germline variants. (B) Principal component analysis of genes with somatic variants.

(C) Frequency of genes can you get lasix without a prescription with germline or somatic variants enriched in FIGC cases in comparison with SIGC cases. Purple for genes with germline events and orange for genes with somatic events. (D) Heatmap and dendrogram of a panel of genes with the highest frequency of germline and/or somatic variants in FIGC (n=50) versus SIGC (n=47).

(E) Age can you get lasix without a prescription at diagnosis of FIGC (n=50) and SIGC cases (n=47). (F) Average number of somatic variants detected in FIGC (n=50) and SIGC cases (n=47). White, gene with no variants.

Purple, gene with can you get lasix without a prescription germline variants. Orange, gene with somatic variants. Red, gene with germline and somatic variants.

P values can you get lasix without a prescription calculated with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. FIGC, familial intestinal gastric cancer. SIGC, sporadic intestinal gastric cancer, PC1, principal component 1.

PC2, principal component 2.We next can you get lasix without a prescription explored whether these FIGC and SIGC were also distinct at the germline and/or somatic levels. Principal component analysis revealed that certain genes were differentially associated with FIGCs and SIGCs (figure 4A,B). Specifically, common germline variants in TP53 were present in more than 50% of FIGC probands, while only 11% of SIGC cases presented these germline variants (figure 4A,C).

At the somatic level, the frequency of BRCA2, ATM, FOXF1, FHIT, SDHB, MSH6, CTNNA1 and PXN could distinguish FIGC from SIGC tumours, with more than 50% of FIGC displaying common variants in these genes, as compared with very low frequencies in SIGC (figure 4B,C).By combining all germline and somatic landscapes of 50 FIGCs and 47 SIGCs focusing only on the abovementioned genes, and using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, two main can you get lasix without a prescription clusters were evidenced separating most FIGCs from SIGCs (figure 4D). Whereas FIGCs carried both germline and somatic variants in TP53, BRCA2, ATM, FOXF1, FHIT, SDHB, MSH6, CTNNA1 and PXN genes, SIGCs lacked TP53 and FHIT germline and somatic variants and mainly presented BRCA2, ATM, FOXF1, SDHB, MSH6, CTNNA1 and PXN somatic variants.Further supporting that FIGC represents a different entity likely evolving for longer than SIGCs is the fact that FIGC tumours presented statistically significantly more somatic common variants than SIGC tumours (p=4.2E-06), even if arising from patients 10 years younger on average (figure 4E,F).To further understand whether FIGC is a genetic entity also distinct from HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative, we compared the germline and somatic landscapes of 7 FIGCs and 17 HDGCs sequenced with the same Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) panel. We verified that indeed FIGC and HDGC also display considerable differences between germline and somatic landscapes (online supplementary figure 2)().

However, the low number of FIGC cases possible to analyse, which was due to sequencing panel differences, hampers more formal conclusions.Overall, our results suggest that FIGC, rather than a monogenic disease, is likely a polygenic disease with distinctive germline and somatic landscapes from SIGC and HDGC-CDH1-negative.DiscussionFIGC presents an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of IGC, without gastric polyposis, and has been clinically defined by analogy to the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC.9 However, lack of novel data supporting familial aggregation of IGC at a given age of onset can you get lasix without a prescription as well as the non-existence of tumour spectrum descriptions have impeded the redefinition of FIGC testing criteria, useful for identification and management of these families.The primary strength of this study is the use of a large homogeneous cohort of probands with IGC, familial aggregation of GC, detailed personal/family history, age of disease onset and disease spectrum. This series does not present clinical criteria compatible with any other gastrointestinal cancer-associated syndrome, is clearly enriched in GC and mainly of intestinal type, which suggests this is the first data-driven testing criteria for FIGC families. We propose that any family presenting two GC cases, one confirmed of intestinal histology, independently of age, and with or without colorectal cancer, breast cancer or gastric ulcers in other family members, could be considered FIGC.Besides potential testing criteria, our study also reported the first large-scale sequencing analysis of the germline and somatic landscapes of FIGC and respective comparisons with comparable landscapes of SIGC and HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative.

We used these data to explore the unknown inherited nature of FIGC can you get lasix without a prescription. Among the FIGC-exclusive germline rare variants found, the missense PMS1 c.224C>T variant was the only one predicted as pathogenic in family P1. Deleterious variants in this DNA mismatch repair protein (PMS1, OMIM:600258) can be found in HNPCC families, either alone or co-occurring with mutations in other HNPCC-related genes.32 33 However, the real contribution of PMS1 germline mutations for HNPCC predisposition is still debatable.

Liu et al33 detected PMS1 and MSH2 can you get lasix without a prescription germline mutations in an HNPCC proband with an MSI tumour, and observed that only the MSH2 germline mutation was shared with another member of the family affected with colorectal cancer, thus demonstrating that MSH2 is the real predisposing gene to colorectal cancer in this family. Notwithstanding, they postulated that the PMS1 mutation could contribute to the unusual number of lung cancer cases in this HNPCC family.33 Our FIGC proband (P1) carrying a PMS1 germline variant displayed an MSI-low tumour, consistent with the fact that Pms1-deficient mice do not show an increased mutation rate (MSI) in the colonic epithelium.34 Although we lack full evidence for the potentially causative role of this PMS1 variant in family P1, namely a second-hit in the tumour and segregation analysis, this remains an open possibility. The same applied to family P27, where potentially truncating variants are simultaneously found in SMAD4 and PRSS1, but no second somatic-hits are found in these genes.

Overall, these findings do not strongly support a monogenic nature for FIGC, at least as evident as that seen for CDH1-associated HDGC or GAPPS.In the last decade, several studies have integrated large-scale normal and tumour sequencing data to ascertain the impact can you get lasix without a prescription of germline variation on tumour evolution.35–38 For example, Carter et al36 identified germline variants that can either dramatically increase the frequency of somatic mutations or influence the site where a tumour develops. Others have shown that rare germline truncations in cancer susceptibility genes, including BRCA1, BRCA2, FANCM and MSH6, are significantly associated with increased somatic mutation frequencies in specific cancer types, suggesting that germline and somatic levels are intrinsically linked.37 Our findings revealed that, independently of the presence of rare germline variants, FIGC families displayed similar germline and somatic variant burden and landscapes, suggesting that this type of inherited variation may not be a major determinant of tumour development in these families. Interestingly, we found that MSI and MSS tumours from FIGC families lacking rare germline variants displayed a similar somatic variant burden, while MSI tumours from families carrying single/multiple germline rare variants tend to harbour more somatic variants than MSS tumour-bearing families.

Altogether, these findings suggest that rare germline defects involving the DNA repair system may extend to the somatic level, can you get lasix without a prescription as previously demonstrated in other cancer types.37 38Our study, as the previous ones, failed to find the monogenic factor that genetically determined the occurrence of FIGC. However, before excluding the possibility of considering our FIGC series as a sporadic cohort, we explored the average age of onset of probands, number of somatic variants, and their germline and somatic landscapes as compared with other GC entities. This analysis showed that FIGC probands developed GC at least 10 years earlier and carried more TP53 germline common variants than SIGC, that 38% of FIGC tumours were MSI, but also that FIGC tumours displayed significantly more somatic common variants than SIGC tumours, as well as a specific germline and somatic variant profile.

In addition, this germline and can you get lasix without a prescription somatic variant profile was also different from that presented by HDGC cases lacking CDH1 germline causal variants. Therefore, the analysis of the large-scale normal and tumour sequencing data from FIGC, SIGC and HDGC-CDH1 mutation-negative cases was instrumental to define FIGC as a distinct clinical and molecular entity.Altogether, these data support the idea of a so far unrecognised genetically determined factor(s) that promotes IGC in probands and GC in their close relatives, with an apparent pattern of autosomal inheritance, and that despite late onset it presents earlier than SIGC. Further, FIGC seems to evolve through a different path from SIGC, starting the accumulation of somatic variants earlier and often triggering MSI, as part of their evolution.Our study displayed some limitations, such as the fact that our custom NGS panels did not account for all possible cancer predisposition genes, hence other genes may contribute to FIGC risk.

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Best biomedical bake (best cake) Best group photo with placard(s) Best group workplace photo Best individual photo with placard Best individual workplace photo Best artistic biomedical science photo Best biomedical science 'under the microscope' photo Best biomedical science meme Best biomedical science video Best Biomedical Science Day artwork To enter, you will need to submit your photos to us via our Facebook page (@biomedicalscience) or tweet your picture to us (@IBMScience) using #AtTheHeartOfHealthcare or via email at website@ibms.org and we’ll add it to our Facebook gallery. For the video competition, upload your 12.5 mg lasix for dogs video to YouTube and send the link to website@ibms.org.The top photos (and video) from each category will receive a prize and award!. All winners will be notified by Tuesday 29th June.If you need some inspiration, check out our winners from last year!. Please note:Always make sure there are no confidential details visible whilst maintaining workplace health and safety regulations 12.5 mg lasix for dogs and ensure you have permission to take photos, from both your senior management and anyone appearing in them.

The IBMS may use any images you submit to us for marketing purposes including on our social media channels or website. It is your responsibility to obtain the agreement of all people present in your photos, by sending us your photo you are consenting to us using them for the reasons outlined above.7 June 2021 The IBMS has awarded two new Honorary Fellowships for 2021. We would 12.5 mg lasix for dogs like to congratulate and welcome our newest Honorary Fellows - Jill Rodney and Jane Mills. IBMS Honorary Fellowship is awarded to non-members of high repute and distinction who have made a significant impact on the profession.

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New routes to registration were developed, qualifications were enhanced at every grade of membership, bursaries and awards were given to help members learn and attend Congress, professional services were kept relevant and up to date, and biomedical scientists began to see their roles expand into advanced practice. In 2020, Jill surmised all of her previous efforts by helping 12.5 mg lasix for dogs the IBMS to flourish during a global lasix - enabling staff to continue supporting, progressing and promoting the Institute’s members and their profession." Jill's extensive contribution to the profession will be felt for years to come and we'd like to congratulate her on all the excellent work over the last ten years. Jane Mills Jane is currently Head of Programme for hypertension medications testing with NHS England and Improvement. During the lasix, Jane has been personally responsible for ensuring that all of the testing laboratories in England received and maintained the reagent stocks they needed during a time when there was a global shortage of reagents.

Jane's nominator 12.5 mg lasix for dogs commented. "Jane Mills is absolutely deserving of recognition, celebration and accolade for her tireless dedication and invaluable contributions, over and beyond expectation, in enabling hypertension medications testing across the NHS in England. Jane has been working tirelessly with the Pathology community and Biomedical Scientists in ensuring they have the tools they needed during the lasix." We would like to thank Jane for going above and beyond to ensure the hypertension medications testing programme could go ahead despite the immense challenges..

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For the bravest amongst the workforce, there is even a video competition – we’re expecting sing-alongs and comedy shorts to be the flavour of the day.There are ten awards up for grabs. Best biomedical bake (best cake) Best group photo with placard(s) Best group workplace photo Best individual photo with placard Best individual workplace photo Best artistic biomedical science photo Best biomedical science 'under the microscope' photo Best biomedical science meme Best biomedical science video Best Biomedical Science Day artwork To enter, you will need to submit your photos to us via our Facebook page (@biomedicalscience) or tweet your picture to us (@IBMScience) using #AtTheHeartOfHealthcare or via email at website@ibms.org and we’ll add it to our Facebook gallery. For the video competition, upload your video to YouTube and send the link to website@ibms.org.The top photos (and video) from each category will receive can you get lasix without a prescription a prize and award!.

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It is your responsibility to obtain the agreement of all people present in your photos, by sending us your photo you are consenting to us using them for the reasons outlined above.7 June 2021 The IBMS has awarded two new Honorary Fellowships for 2021. We would like to congratulate and welcome our newest Honorary Fellows - Jill Rodney and Jane can you get lasix without a prescription Mills. IBMS Honorary Fellowship is awarded to non-members of high repute and distinction who have made a significant impact on the profession.

Two new Honorary Fellows Jill Rodney Jill recently retired from her position as Chief can you get lasix without a prescription Executive of the IBMS after a decade in the role. Jill helped to bring the IBMS into the 21st Century and then made sure it was robust and adaptable enough to continue thriving without her. Jill's nominator commented.

"Under Jill’s watch, IBMS members at all levels can you get lasix without a prescription of the profession were given more ways to develop and keep their practice current. New routes to registration were developed, qualifications were enhanced at every grade of membership, bursaries and awards were given to help members learn and attend Congress, professional services were kept relevant and up to date, and biomedical scientists began to see their roles expand into advanced practice. In 2020, Jill surmised all of her previous efforts by helping the IBMS to flourish during a global lasix - enabling staff to continue supporting, progressing and promoting the Institute’s members and their profession." Jill's extensive contribution to the profession will be felt for years to come and we'd like to congratulate her on can you get lasix without a prescription all the excellent work over the last ten years.

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